There’s a Book for That

There's a Book for That: Memorial Day

On Monday, May 28th, we pay tribute to the American men and women who have died in service to our country. To honor the occasion, we are highlighting titles — fiction and nonfiction — with themes that honor the service and sacrifice of our nation’s military.

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  "A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself." – Joseph Campbell   Touching the Dragon by James Hatch and Christian D'AndreaTOUCHING THE DRAGON AND OTHER TECHNIQUES FOR SURVIVING LIFE'S WARS by James Hatch, Christian D'Andrea From former special ops Navy SEAL senior chief; master naval parachutist (four Bronze Stars with Valor, Navy and Marine Corps Medal recipient, etc.); fighter in 150 missions (Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Africa); expert military dog trainer and handler whose SEAL dogs were partners and medal winners—a fierce, moving tale of a return from hell, being badly wounded on a special ops mission that ended his two-decades-long military career, his searing recovery, and the struggle to live life off the speeding train of war.   Eyewitness to World War II by Stephen G. HyslopEYEWITNESS TO WORLD WAR II: UNFORGETTABLE STORIES FROM HISTORY'S GREATEST CONFLICT by Stephen G. Hyslop, Winston Groom (National Geographic) This elegant narrative edition of Neil Kagan’s best-selling Eyewitness to World War II offers incredible first-person stories and amazing moments of heroism, providing new context and perspective on history’s greatest conflict.   Bring Out the Dog by Will MackinBRING OUT THE DOG: STORIES by Will Mackin In the tradition of The Things They Carried and Redeployment, a debut short story collection from a U.S. Navy veteran who completed five combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan—a remarkable portrait of the absurdity and poetry that define life in the most clandestine circles of modern warfare.     The World Remade by G. J. MeyerTHE WORLD REMADE: AMERICA IN WORLD WAR I by G. J. Meyer A bracing, indispensable account of America’s epoch-defining involvement in the Great War, rich with fresh insights into the key issues, events, tumultuous politics, and towering historical figures that defined the era and led to the emergence of the United States as the dominant global power.     My Fellow Soldiers by Andrew CarrollMY FELLOW SOLDIERS; GENERAL JOHN PERSHING AND THE AMERICANS WHO HELPED WIN THE GREAT WAR by Andrew Carroll A vivid and moving account of the American experience in World War I, with General John Pershing featured prominently in the foreground, drawing on both little-known and newly uncovered letters and diaries. Woven throughout Pershing’s story are the experiences of a remarkable group of American men and women, both the famous and unheralded. The chorus of these voices makes the high stakes of this epic American saga piercingly real and demonstrates the war’s profound impact on the individuals who served.   The Long Road Home by Martha RaddatzTHE LONG ROAD HOME: A STORY OF WAR AND FAMILY by Martha Raddatz Tie-in to National Geographic Channel’s miniseries—ABC News’ Chief Global Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz shares remarkable tales of heroism, hope, and heartbreak in her account of “Black Sunday”—a battle during one of the deadliest periods of the Iraq War.   The Vietnam War by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken BurnsTHE VIETNAM WAR: AN INTIMATE HISTORY by Geoffrey C. Ward, Ken Burns Companion to the acclaimed PBS series More than forty years after it ended, the Vietnam War continues to haunt our country. We still argue over why we were there, whether we could have won, and who was right and wrong in their response to the conflict. Now, continuing in the tradition of their critically acclaimed collaborations, the authors draw on dozens and dozens of interviews in America and Vietnam to give us the perspectives of people involved at all levels of the war   Shooting Ghosts by Thomas J. Brennan USMC (Ret.) and Finbarr O'ReillySHOOTING GHOSTS: A U.S. MARINE, A COMBAT PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEIR JOURNEY BACK FROM WAR by Thomas J. Brennan USMC (Ret.), Finbarr O'Reilly A unique joint memoir by a U.S. Marine and a conflict photographer, whose unlikely friendship helped both heal their war-wounded bodies and souls. Their story, told in alternating first-person narratives, is about the things they saw and did, the ways they have been affected, and how they have navigated the psychological aftershocks of war and wrestled with reforming their own identities and moral centers.   War and Turpentine by Stefan HertmansWAR AND TURPENTINE: A NOVEL by Stefan Hertmans, David Mckay A critically acclaimed and internationally celebrated novel of war, art, and memory. The life of Urbain Martien—artist, soldier, survivor of World War I—lies contained in two notebooks he left behind when he died in 1981. In War and Turpentine, his grandson, a writer, retells his grandfather’s story, the notebooks providing a key to the locked chambers of Urbain’s memory.   The Frozen Hours by Jeff ShaaraTHE FROZEN HOURS: A NOVEL OF THE KOREAN WAR by Jeff Shaara A riveting novel about the Korean War and the Battle of Chosin Reservoir, written with Jeff Shaara’s signature “you-are-there” immediacy and intense, varying perspectives.     FOR YOUNGER READERS   Boots on the Ground by Elizabeth PartridgeBOOTS ON THE GROUND: AMERICA'S WAR IN VIETNAM by Elizabeth Partridge (for middle grades and up) The history of the Vietnam era is complex; the cultural impact extraordinary. But it’s the personal stories of eight people—six American soldiers, one American nurse, and one Vietnamese refugee—that form the heartbeat of Boots on the Ground. Alternating with these chapters are profiles of key American leaders and events, reminding us what was happening at home, including Kent State, Woodstock, and Watergate. This show-stopping book is Elizabeth Partridge at her finest.   The Not-So-Boring Letters of Private Nobody by Matthew LandisTHE NOT-SO-BORING LETTERS OF PRIVATE NOBODY by Matthew Landis A trio of seventh graders become one another’s first friends as they discover the secrets of a Civil War soldier in this middle grade novel for fans of Gordon Korman and Gary Schmidt. “Author [Matthew Landis], himself an eighth grade social studies teacher, has produced an American history educator’s dream novel.” —School Library Connection   For more on these and related titles visit the collection Memorial Day 2018
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There’s a Book for That: Time Travel

This time, it’s about time: Italian theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli’s latest book, THE ORDER OF TIME, released last week and his calendar is full! Rovelli discussed time travel, how he’s working on a way to quantify gravity in which time doesn’t exist.and more on NPR’s “Science Friday.”(Listen to the full segment here).

In a parallel universe, the site Unbound Worlds has also taken up the theme of time travel in excellent fashion. All worm-holes and word worlds considered, if there is no “time” then the following books are indeed timeless:

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  The Order of Time by Carlo RovelliTHE ORDER OF TIME by Carlo Rovelli “Meet the new Stephen Hawking…The Order of Time is a dazzling book.”—The Sunday Times From the bestselling author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics, a concise, elegant exploration of time. Why do we remember the past and not the future? What does it mean for time to “flow”? Do we exist in time or does time exist in us? In lyric, accessible prose, Carlo Rovelli invites us to consider questions about the nature of time that continue to puzzle physicists and philosophers alike. Weaving together ideas from philosophy, science and literature, he suggests that our perception of the flow of time depends on our perspective, better understood starting from the structure of our brain and emotions   A Brief History of Time by Stephen HawkingA BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME by Stephen Hawking A landmark volume in science writing by one of the great minds of our time, Stephen Hawking’s book explores such profound questions as: How did the universe begin—and what made its start possible? Does time always flow forward? Is the universe unending—or are their boundaries? Are there other dimensions in space? What happens when it all ends? Told in language we can all understand, A Brief History of Time plunges into the exotic realms of black holes and quarks, of antimatter and “arrows of time,” of the big bang and a bigger God—where the possibilites are wondrous and unexpected.   From Eternity to Here by Sean CarrollFROM ETERNITY TO HERE: THE QUEST FOR THE ULTIMATE THEORY OF TIME by Sean Carroll In A Brief History of Time, Stephen Hawking tried to explain time by understanding the Big Bang. In his book, Sean Carroll says we need to be more ambitious. From Eternity to Here is no less than the next step toward understanding how we came to exist, and a fantastically approachable read that will appeal to a broad audience of armchair physicists, and anyone who ponders the nature of our world.   Time Travel by James GleickTIME TRAVEL: A HISTORY by James Gleick From the acclaimed bestselling author of The Information and Chaos, a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influence on our understanding of time itself.     FICTION: How to Stop Time by Matt HaigHOW TO STOP TIME by Matt Haig A love story across the ages—and for the ages—about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetimes it can take to learn how to live. How to Stop Time is a bighearted, wildly original novel about losing and finding yourself, the inevitability of change, and how with enough time to learn how, we just might find happiness.   The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century by THE BEST TIME TRAVEL STORIES OF THE 20TH CENTURY: STORIES BY ARTHUR C. CLARKE, JACK FINNEY, JOE HALDEMAN, URSULA K. LE GUIN, LARRY NIVEN, THEODORE STURGEON, CONNIE WILLIS, AND MORE Edited by Harry Turtledove and Martin H. Greenberg Some of the finest science fiction writers of the 20th Century, writing seventeen of the most exciting time travel short stories ever published.   The Time Machine by H.G. WellsTHE TIME MACHINE by H.G. Wells When a Victorian scientist propels himself into the year a.d. 802,701, he is initially delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty, contentment, and peace. Entranced at first by the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man, he soon realizes that these beautiful people are simply remnants of a once-great culture—now weak and childishly afraid of the dark. They have every reason to be afraid: in deep tunnels beneath their paradise lurks another race descended from humanity—the sinister Morlocks. And when the scientist’s time machine vanishes, it becomes clear he must search these tunnels if he is ever to return to his own era.   FOR YOUNGER READERS:   CHARLOTTE SOMETIMES by Penelope FarmerCHARLOTTE SOMETIMES by Penelope A time-travel story that is both a poignant exploration of human identity and an absorbing tale of suspense. It’s natural to feel a little out of place when you’re the new kid, but when Charlotte Makepeace wakes up after her first night at boarding school, she’s baffled: everyone thinks she’s a girl called Clare Mobley, and even more shockingly, it seems she has traveled forty years back in time to 1918. Time Traveling with a Hamster by Ross WelfordTIME TRAVELING WITH A HAMSTER by Ross Welford One of New York Public Library’s Best Books for Children Back to the Future meets The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time in this original, poignant, race-against-time story about a boy who travels back to 1984 to save his father’s life.   For more on these and related titles visit Time
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Friday Reads: North Korea

North Korea has been prominent in headlines this week. The New York Times read, “Releasing 3 Americans, North Koreans Signal Openness to Washington.Curiosity and concern is continuous about what a meeting between President Trump and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-Un would mean for the world. To respond to that curiosity, we’ve gathered strong fiction and nonfiction titles related to North Korea: from personal memoirs of escape to journalistic accounts of the repressive regime to award-winning fiction:

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  Nothing to Envy by Barbara DemickNOTHING TO ENVY: ORDINARY LIVES IN NORTH KOREA by Barbara Demick From a first-rate journalist, the first book to penetrate the mind-set of ordinary North Korean citizens and to present a never-before-seen view of daily life in the world’s most repressive regime. Demick follows six subjects—a party loyalist and her rebellious daughter, a disillusioned young doctor, a hungry young orphan, and a pair of lovers from different classes—as they raise families, nurture ambitions, struggle for survival, and ultimately realize that their government has betrayed them.   In Order to Live by Yeonmi Park and Maryanne VollersIN ORDER TO LIVE: A NORTH KOREAN GIRL'S JOURNEY TO FREEDOM by Yeonmi Park, Maryanne Vollers “I am most grateful for two things: that I was born in North Korea, and that I escaped from North Korea.” In In Order to Live, Yeonmi Park shines a light not just into the darkest corners of life in North Korea, describing the deprivation and deception she endured and which millions of North Korean people continue to endure to this day, but also onto her own most painful and difficult memories. She tells with bravery and dignity for the first time the story of how she and her mother were betrayed and sold into sexual slavery in China and forced to suffer terrible psychological and physical hardship before they finally made their way to Seoul, South Korea—and to freedom.   Without You, There Is No Us by Suki KimWITHOUT YOU, THERE IS NO US: UNDERCOVER AMONG THE SONS OF NORTH KOREA'S ELITE by Suki Kim It is 2011, and all universities in North Korea have been shut down for an entire year, the students sent to construction fields—except for the 270 students at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST), a prisonlike complex where portraits of Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il look on impassively from the walls of every room, and where Suki Kim has accepted a job teaching English. Over the next six months, she will live under the watchful eye of the regime. Then Kim Jong-il dies, leaving the students devastated, and leading Suki to question whether the gulf between her world and theirs can ever be bridged.   Escape from Camp 14 by Blaine HardenESCAPE FROM CAMP 14: ONE MAN'S REMARKABLE ODYSSEY FROM NORTH KOREA TO FREEDOM IN THE WEST by Blaine Harden The heart-wrenching New York Times bestseller about the only known person born inside a North Korean prison camp to have escaped. Harden’s harrowing narrative exposes this hidden dystopia, focusing on an extraordinary young man who came of age inside the highest security prison in the highest security state.   How I Became a North Korean by Krys LeeHOW I BECAME A NORTH KOREAN: A NOVEL by Krys Lee In this dazzling, intense, debut novel by the award-winning author of the short story collection Drifting House, three characters struggle to make new lives for themselves in the dangerous region where China borders North Korea. Transporting the reader to one of the most complex and threatening environments in the world, and exploring how humanity persists, even in the direst circumstances, How I Became a North Korean is a brilliant and essential first novel by one of our most promising writers.   The Orphan Master's Son by Adam JohnsonTHE ORPHAN MASTER'S SON: A NOVEL by Adam Johnson Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, The Orphan Master’s Son is the story of a North Korean orphan who rises up through the ranks of the DPRK army as a tunnel soldier, a professional kidnapper, and a military intelligence officer, ultimately to become—for a very short time—a rival to the Dear Leader, Kim Jong-il. Yet it is also a love story—as one character in the novel claims, “the greatest North Korean love story ever told.” After reading it, you’ll never look at a map of the Korean peninsula the same way.     For more on these and related titles visit North Korea
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There's a Book for That: Mother's Day

“Youth fades; love droops; the leaves of friendship fall; A mother’s secret hope outlives them all.”Oliver Wendell Holmes

It’s been more than 100 years since Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Mother’s Day a national celebration in May 1914! Mother’s Day, 2018, is this Sunday, May 12th.

The mother-child bond is such a profound one – loving, complex, and sometimes painful. Over the course of a lifetime, roles may switch due to old age or illness. To honor the occasion, here are 10 incredible memoirs, some by celebrity authors, which reveal the emotional nuances and intensity of perhaps the most fundamental relationship in our lives:

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  Ma Speaks Up by Marianne LeoneMA SPEAKS UP: AND A FIRST-GENERATION DAUGHTER TALKS BACK by Marianne Leone The acclaimed actress and author of Jesse: A Mother’s Story tells the story of her outspoken, frequently outrageous Italian immigrant mother. Ma Speaks Up is a record of growing up on the wrong side of the tracks, with the wrong family, in the wrong religion. Though Marianne’s girlhood is flooded with shame, it’s equally packed with adventure, love, great cooking, and, above all, humor. The extremely premature birth of Marianne’s beloved son, Jesse, bonds mother and daughter in ways she couldn’t have imagined. The stories she tells will speak to anyone who has struggled with outsider status in any form and, of course, to mothers and their blemished, cherished girls.   Where the Light Gets In by Kimberly Williams-PaisleyWHERE THE LIGHT GETS IN: LOSING MY MOTHER ONLY TO FIND HER AGAIN by Kimberly Williams-Paisley, Michael J. Fox Many know Kimberly Williams-Paisley as the bride in the popular Steve Martin remakes of the Father of the Bride movies, the calculating Peggy Kenter on Nashville, or the wife of country singer Brad Paisley. But in 2014, Kim revealed a tragic secret: Her mother was diagnosed with a rare form of dementia called primary progressive aphasia at the age of 61. In Where the Light Gets In, Kim tells the full story of her mother’s illness, from diagnosis through the present day, drawing on her memories of her relationship with the fascinating, successful woman who raised her so well.   The Liars' Club by Mary KarrTHE LIARS' CLUB: A MEMOIR (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Mary Karr, Lena Dunham, Brian Rea When it was first published, THE LIARS’ CLUB took the world by storm and raised the art of the memoir to an entirely new level, bringing about a dramatic revival of the form. Karr’s comic childhood in an east Texas oil town brings us characters as darkly hilarious as any of J. D. Salinger’s—a hard-drinking daddy, a sister who can talk down the sheriff at age twelve, and an oft-married mother whose accumulated secrets threaten to destroy them all. Now with a new foreword by Lena Dunham, a creative game changer in her own right, this unsentimental and profoundly moving account of an apocalyptic childhood is as “funny, lively, and un-put-downable” (USA Today) today as it ever was.   There Was a Little Girl by Brooke ShieldsTHERE WAS A LITTLE GIRL: THE REAL STORY OF MY MOTHER AND ME by Brooke Shields Brooke Shields never had what anyone would consider an ordinary life. She was raised by her Newark-tough single mom, Teri, a woman who loved the world of show business and was often a media sensation all by herself. Brooke’s iconic modeling career began by chance when she was only eleven months old, and Teri’s skills as both Brooke’s mother and her manager were formidable. But in private she was troubled and drank heavily. Only Brooke knows the truth of the remarkable, difficult, complicated woman who was her mother. And in this honest, open memoir about her life growing up, Brooke will reveal stories and feelings that are relatable to anyone who has been a mother or daughter.   My Two Moms by Zach WahlsMY TWO MOMS by Zach Wahls In My Two Moms, Zach offers a stirring, brave defense of his family. Raised by two moms in a conservative Midwestern town, Zach’s parents instilled in him values that families everywhere can embrace—values driven home by his journey toward becoming an Eagle Scout. Zach’s upbringing couldn’t have been more mainstream—he played sports, was active in Boy Scouts, and led his high school speech and debate team—yet, growing up with two moms, he knows what it’s like to feel different and fear being bullied, or worse.   Blue Nights by Joan DidionBLUE NIGHTS by Joan Didion Following the acclaimed and bestselling The Year of Magical Thinking, Blue Nights is Joan Didion’s intensely personal and moving account of the death of her daughter, Quintana, and her thoughts, fears, and doubts about motherhood, illness, and aging.     Then Again by Diane KeatonTHEN AGAIN by Diane Keaton, Anna Quindlen “Mom loved adages, quotes, slogans. There were always little reminders pasted on the kitchen wall. For example, the word THINK. I found THINK thumbtacked on a bulletin board in her darkroom. I saw it Scotch-taped on a pencil box she’d collaged. I even found a pamphlet titled THINK on her bedside table. Mom liked to THINK.” So begins Diane Keaton’s unforgettable memoir about her mother and herself. In it you will meet the woman known to tens of millions as Annie Hall, but you will also meet, and fall in love with, her mother, the loving, complicated, always-thinking Dorothy Hall.   The Center of the Universe by Nancy BachrachTHE CENTER OF THE UNIVERSE: A MEMOIR by Nancy Bachrach The story is so improbable, it can only be true: A brilliant woman with a long history of mental illness—who once proclaimed herself to be "the center of the universe" — is miraculously cured by accidental carbon monoxide poisoning aboard the family boat. Nancy Bachrach warns readers, “Don’t try this at home” in her darkly humorous memoir about “the second coming” of her mother — the indomitable Lola, whose buried family secrets had been driving her crazy.   Circling My Mother by Mary GordonCIRCLING MY MOTHER by Mary Gordon Anna Gagliano Gordon, who died in 2002 at the age of 94, was the personification of the culture of the mid-century American Catholic working class. A hard-working single mother – Mary Gordon's father died when she was still a girl – she managed to hold down a job, dress smartly, raise her daughter on her own, and worship the beauty in life with a surprising joie de vivre. Bringing her exceptional talent for detail, character, and scene to bear on the life of her mother, Gordon gives us a deeply felt and powerfully moving book about their relationship. Toward the end of Anna's life, we watch the author care for her mother in old age, beginning to reclaim from memory the vivid woman who helped her sail forth into her own life.   All Over but the Shoutin' by Rick BraggALL OVER BUT THE SHOUTIN' by Rick Bragg This haunting, harrowing, gloriously moving recollection of a life on the American margin is the story of Rick Bragg, who grew up dirt-poor in northeastern Alabama, seemingly destined for either the cotton mills or the penitentiary, and instead became a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The New York Times. It is the story of Bragg's father, a hard-drinking man with a murderous temper and the habit of running out on the people who needed him most. But at the center of this soaring memoir is Bragg's mother, who went eighteen years without a new dress so that her sons could have school clothes and picked other people's cotton so that her children wouldn't have to live on welfare alone. Evoking these lives--and the country that shaped and nourished them--with artistry, honesty, and compassion, Rick Bragg brings home the love and suffering that lie at the heart of every family. The result is unforgettable.   For more on these and relateed titles visit mothers
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com  

There's a Book for That: Children's Book Week

It’s Children’s Book Week from May 1st to May 7th and do we have books to celebrate! Established in 1919, Children’s Book Week is the longest-running national literacy initiative in the country.

Considering recent raves from School Library Journal, Horn Book, Indie Next and “much love” from booksellers and librarians here are a dozen books reflecting many cultures and situations, from the silly to the serious. Whether told from a human or animal perspective, these are books to buy, borrow and relish!

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  Boots on the Ground by Elizabeth PartridgeBOOTS ON THE GROUND: AMERICA'S WAR IN VIETNAM by Elizabeth Partridge First came John Lennon. Then Marching for Freedom. Now National Book Award-finalist Elizabeth Partridge takes on the ultimate 60s topic: Vietnam. The history of this era is complex; the cultural impact extraordinary. But it’s the personal stories of eight people—six   Don't Blink! by Amy Krouse RosenthalDON'T BLINK! By Amy Krouse Rosenthal, David Roberts From New York Times bestselling author and illustrator Amy Krouse Rosenthal and David Roberts comes a playful, super-duper interactive bedtime story, narrated by a cheeky stuffed owl. Kids love a challenge, and you can bet they’ll do their darndest to rise to the one set out in Don’t Blink!…especially when bedtime is on the line!   A Land of Permanent Goodbyes by Atia AbawiA LAND OF PERMANENT GOODBYES by Atia Abawi Narrated by Destiny, this heartbreaking—and timely—story of refugees escaping from war-torn Syria is masterfully told by a foreign news correspondent who experienced the crisis firsthand. Destiny narrates this heartbreaking story of the consequences of war, showing the Syrian conflict as part of a long   Honey by David Ezra SteinHONEY by David Ezra Stein Bear is ravenous when he wakes up from his winter sleep and has one thing on his mind: honey! Alas, it is too soon for honey, so Bear tries hard to be patient. The world around him is waking up, too, and he soon remembers all the other things he loves, like warm grass, berries, and rain. He’s almost content, until, one day, he hears a welcome buzzing sound…and finally it is time for Bear to delight in the thing he relishes above all others—and it is as warm, golden, sweet, and good as he remembered.   Islandborn by Junot DíazISLANDBORN by Junot Díaz, Leo Espinosa From New York Times bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winner Junot Díaz comes a debut picture book about the magic of memory and the infinite power of the imagination. Gloriously illustrated and lyrically written, Islandborn is a celebration of creativity, diversity, and our imagination’s boundless ability to connect us—to our families, to our past and to ourselves.   Like Vanessa by Tami CharlesLIKE VANESSA by Tami Charles, Vanessa Brantley-Newton Middle graders will laugh and cry with thirteen-year-old Vanessa Martin as she tries to be like Vanessa Williams, the first black Miss America. “It’s such an honor to be the focal point of this wonderful book! Without a doubt, it will be inspiring to a new generation of young, talented girls well on their way to promising careers.” —Vanessa Williams   Can I Be Your Dog? by Troy CummingsCAN I BE YOUR DOG? by Troy Cummings This picture book shares the tale of Arfy, a homeless mutt who lives in a box in an alley. Arfy writes to every person on Butternut Street about what a great pet he’d make. His letters to prospective owners share that he’s house broken! He has his own squeaky bone! He can learn to live with cats! But, no one wants him. Won’t anyone open their heart—and home—to a lonesome dog? Readers will be happily surprised to learn just who steps up to adopt Arfy.   Natsumi! by Susan LendrothNATSUMI! By Susan Lendroth, Priscilla Burris When Natsumi’s family practices for their town’s Japanese arts festival, Natsumi tries everything. But her stirring is way too vigorous for the tea ceremony, her dancing is just too imaginative, and flower arranging doesn’t go any better. Can she find just the right way to put her exuberance to good use? Natsumi is small but full of big exuberance, and puts her girl-power to good use when she discovers a Japanese tradition as energetic as she is.   The Night Diary by Veera HiranandaniTHE NIGHT DIARY by Veera Hiranandani In the vein of Inside Out and Back Again and The War That Saved My Life comes a poignant, personal, and hopeful tale of India’s partition, and of one girl’s journey to find a new home in a divided country Told through Nisha’s letters to her mother, The Night Diary is a heartfelt story of one girl’s search for home, for her own identity…and for a hopeful future.   Love by Matt de la PeñaLOVE by Matt de la Peña, Loren Long “[A] poetic reckoning of the importance of love in a child’s life…eloquent and moving.” - People In this heartfelt celebration of love, Newbery Medal-winning author Matt de la Peña and bestselling illustrator Loren Long depict the many ways we experience this universal bond, which carries us from the day we are born throughout the years of our childhood and beyond. With a lyrical text that’s soothing and inspiring, this tender tale is a needed comfort and a new classic that will resonate with readers of every age.   Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren WolkBEYOND THE BRIGHT SEA by Lauren Wolk Crow has lived her entire life on a tiny piece of the starkly beautiful Elizabeth Islands off the coast of Massachusetts—a small spit of land caught in the long shadow of the abandoned Penikese leper colony. Her only companions are Osh, the man who rescued her from a tiny skiff as an infant and raised her, and Miss Maggie, their neighbor across the sandbar. But it isn’t until the night in 1925 when a mysterious fire appears across the water that an unspoken question of her own history forms in her heart and an unstoppable chain of events is triggered. Using her bravery and perseverance, Crow must follow clues that lead not only to personal treasures, but also to uncovering her lost identity and, ultimately, understanding the true meaning of family.   The Book of Mistakes by Corinna LuykenTHE BOOK OF MISTAKES by Corinna Luyken Zoom meets Beautiful Oops! in this memorable debut about the creative process, and the way in which “mistakes” can blossom into inspiration     For more on these and other outstanding children’s titles visit Children’s Book Week 2018
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com  
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Friday Reads: Maira Kalman

“Everyone I know is looking for solace, hope and a tasty snack.”

― Maira Kalman

Welcome to the multi-faceted, colorful world of Maira Kalman! Her imagination, artistry and smarts are on full display in the books we publish, the most recent of which is CAKE with Barbara Scott-Goodman in which they give us dessert! Kalman has created books for all ages about Lincoln, Jefferson, philosophy, dogs…and has illustrated classic works by Michael Pollan and Strunk and White. Find out more about her here and treat yourself and others to her work:

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  Cake by Maira Kalman and Barbara Scott-GoodmanCAKE by Maira Kalman, Barbara Scott-Goodman In Cake, renowned artist and author Maira Kalman and food writer Barbara Scott-Goodman bring us a beautifully illustrated book dedicated to their mutual love of cakes. Kalman’s enchanting illustrations, in her inimitable style, and Scott-Goodman’s mouthwatering recipes complement each other perfectly, making Cake a joyful whimsical celebration of a timeless dessert.   Max in Hollywood, Baby by Maira KalmanMAX IN HOLLYWOOD, BABY Beloved dog-poet Max is back and he’s taking on Hollywood in this funny, jazzy tale, brought to life by Kalman’s bright illustrations. Enter Max. Dreamer. Poet. Dog. In this rollicking madcap tale, Max and his dazzling Dalmation bride take off to direct a movie in Hollywood.   Beloved DogBELOVED DOG In Beloved Dog, Maira Kalman brings us the dogs in her life, as only she can, and the lessons they have for us all. From the dogs lovingly illustrated in her acclaimed children’s books to the real-life pets who inspire her still, Kalman’s Beloved Dog is a joyful and beautifully illustrated read and, as always, deeply philosophical. Filled with hundreds of gorgeous illustrations rendered uniquely in Kalman’s illimitable style, Beloved Dog is a tribute to the canines that fill our days.   Looking at LincolnLOOKING AT LINCOLN Who was Lincoln really? This little girl wants to find out. She discovers, among other things, that our sixteenth president was a man who believed in freedom for all; had a dog named Fido; loved Mozart, apples, and his wife’s vanilla cake; and kept his notes in his hat. From his boyhood in a log cabin to his famous presidency and untimely death, Maira Kalman shares Lincoln’s remarkable life with young readers in a fresh and exciting way.   Food Rules by Michael PollanFOOD RULES: AN EATER'S MANUAL Michael Pollan’s Food Rules prompted a national discussion helping to change the way Americans approach eating. This new edition illustrated by celebrated artist Maira Kalman—and expanded with a new introduction and nineteen additional food rules—marks an advance in the national dialogue that Food Rules inspired. Many of the new rules, suggested by readers, underscore the central teachings of the original Food Rules, which are that eating doesn’t have to be so complicated and that food is as much about pleasure and community as it is about nutrition and health. A beautiful book to cherish and share, Food Rules guides us with humor, joy, and common sense toward a happier, healthier relationship to food.   And the Pursuit of Happiness by Maira KalmanAND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS Whether returning to America’s historical roots at the Lincoln archive and Jefferson’s Monticello, or taking the pulse of the present day at a town hall meeting in Vermont, an Army base in Kentucky, and the inner chambers of the Supreme Court, Kalman finds evidence of democracy at work all around us. Her route is always one of fascinating indirection, but one that captures and shares in hundreds of beautiful, colorful reasons why we are proud to be Americans.   The Principles of Uncertainty by Maira KalmanTHE PRINCIPLES OF UNCERTAINTY An irresistible invitation to experience life through a beloved artist’s psyche, The Principles of Uncertainty is a compilation of Maira Kalman’s New York Times columns. Part personal narrative, part documentary, part travelogue, part chapbook, and all Kalman, these brilliant, whimsical paintings, ideas, and images - which initially appear random - ultimately form an intricately interconnected worldview, an idiosyncratic inner monologue.   The Elements of Style Illustrated by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. WhiteELEMENTS OF STYLE, ILLUSTRATED The only style manual to ever appear on bestseller lists has explained to millions of readers the basic principles of plain English, and Maira Kalman’s fifty-seven exquisite illustrations give the revered work a jolt of new energy, making the learning experience more colorful and clear.   For more on featured Eudora Welty titles visit: Maira Kalman  

There’s a Book for That: Poem in Your Pocket Day

April 26, 2018 is Poem in Your Pocket Day! Initiated in 2002 in partnership with the New York City Departments of Cultural Affairs and Education, Poem in Your Pocket Day has been adopted by all fifty states. In 2016, the League of Canadian Poets extended Poem in Your Pocket Day to Canada.

As a grassroots part of National Poetry Month, people celebrate by selecting a poem, carrying it with them, and sharing it with others throughout the day at schools, bookstores, libraries, parks, workplaces, and on Twitter using the hashtag #pocketpoem. Find out more ways to celebrate at Poets.org

Everyman’s Library Pocket Poet Series editions are ideal collections to read, savor and share. Here are 8 gorgeous volumes, of the more than 100 in the series, edited by some of our most distinguished poets. Spread the word!

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  The Language of Flowers by THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS: POEMS edited by Jane Holloway Transcending the charm of its Victorian predecessors, this anthology creates an extended, updated, and more robust floral anthology for the twenty-first century, presenting poets through the ages from Sappho, Shakespeare, and Shelley to Ted Hughes, Mary Oliver, and Louise Glück, and across the world from Cuba to Korea, Russia to Zimbabwe. Eastern cultures, rich in flower associations, are well represented: Tang poems celebrating chrysanthemums and peonies, Zen poems about orchids and lotus flowers, poems about jasmine and marigolds from India, and roses and narcissi from Persia, the Ottoman empire, and the Arabic world. The most timeless human emotions and concepts—love, hope, despair, fidelity, grief, beauty, and mortality—find colorful expression in The Language of Flowers.   The Echoing Green by THE ECHOING GREEN: POEMS OF FIELDS, MEADOWS, AND GRASSES edited by Cecily Parks The rich poetic history of grass spans the centuries, from the pastoral poems of ancient Rome to the fields and prairies of the New World. The rapturous idealizations of William Blake’s “echoing green” and William Wordsworth’s “splendour in the grass” stand in vivid contrast to the obliterating greenery on human battlefields in war poems such as John McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields” and Carl Sandburg’s “Grass,” or to the work of contemporary poets Lucia Perillo, Harryette Mullen, Denise Levertov, and Gary Soto among them—who reflect on an age of environmental crisis.   The Dance by THE DANCE: POEMS edited by Emily Fragos A celebration in verse of the silent poetry of dance and the dancer, this anthology features a dizzying range of subjects: Chinese dagger dances and Hindu festival dances, belly dancers and whirling dervishes, high school proms and wedding waltzes, tango, tarantella, flamenco, modern dance, reels and jigs, disco, and ballet. Some of the world’s most famous choreographers and dancers move through the poems gathered here: from Nijinsky and Pavlova to Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire, from Isadora Duncan to George Balanchine and Martha Graham, from Bojangles to Baryshnikov. The work of more than 150 poets—including Shakespeare, Milton, Hafiz, Rumi, Li Po, Rilke, Rimbaud, Lorca, Akhmatova, Whitman, Dickinson, Cummings, Eliot, and Merrill—reflects the grace, the drama, the expressive power, and the sheer joy to be found in dance around the world and through the ages.   The Great Cat by THE GREAT CAT: POEMS ABOUT CATS edited by Emily Fragos The feline has inspired poetic adoration since the days of the pharaohs, and the poems collected here cover an astonishing range of periods, cultures, and styles. Poets across the continents and centuries have described the feline family–from kittens to old toms, pussycats to panthers–doing what they do best: sleeping, prowling, prancing, purring, sleeping some more, and gazing disdainfully at lesser beings like ourselves. Here are Yeats’s Minnaloushe, Christopher Smart’s Jeoffry, Lewis Carroll’s Cheshire Cat, T. S. Eliot’s Rum Tum Tugger, William Blake’s tyger and Rilke’s panther. Here are tributes from Sufi mystics, medieval Chinese poets, and haiku masters of imperial Japan, from Chaucer, Shelley, Borges, Neruda, Dickinson, and Shakespeare. Here are the cats of Mother Goose, and the one who wore the hat for Dr. Seuss.   Eat, Drink, and Be Merry by EAT, DRINK, AND BE MERRY: POEMS ABOUT FOOD AND DRINK edited by Peter Washington All kinds of foods and beverages are laid out in these pages, along with picnics and banquets, intimate suppers and quiet dinners, noisy parties and public celebrations–in poems by Horace, Catullus, Hafiz, Rumi, Rilke, Moore, Nabokov, Updike, Mandelstam, Stevens, and many others. From Sylvia Plath’s ecstatic vision of juice-laden berries in “Blackberrying” to D. H. Lawrence’s lush celebration of “Figs,” from the civilized comfort of Noël Coward’s “Something on a Tray” to the salacious provocation of Swift’s “Oysters,” from Li Po on “Drinking Alone” to Baudelaire on “The Soul of the Wine,” and from Emily Dickinson’s “Forbidden Fruit” to Elizabeth Bishop’s “A Miracle for Breakfast,” Eat, Drink, and Be Merry serves up a tantalizing and variegated literary feast.   Comic Poems by COMIC POEMS edited by Peter Washington This treasury of humorous poems brings together a sparkling constellation of witty poets–from Lord Rochester to Lewis Carroll, from Edward Lear to Ogden Nash, from Dorothy Parker to W. H. Auden–and embraces a wide range of forms, including limericks, clerihews, ballads, sonnets, and nonsense verse.     On Wings of Song by ON WINGS OF SONG: POEMS ABOUT BIRDS edited by J. D. McClatchy From backyard to barnyard, from hawks to hummingbirds, from pelicans to peacocks, from Coleridge's albatross to Keats's nightingale to Poe's raven-all manner of feathered beings, the inspiration for poetic flights of fancy through the ages, are gathered together in this delightful volume. Some other winged treasures: Emily Dickinson on the jay; Gertrude Stein on pigeons; Seamus Heaney on turkeys; Tennyson on the eagle; Spenser on the merry cuckoo; Amy Clampitt on the whippoorwill; Po Chü-i on cranes; John Updike on seagulls; W.S. Merwin on the duck; Elizabeth Bishop on the sandpiper; Rilke on flamingoes; Margaret Atwood on vultures; the Bible on the ostrich; Sylvia Plath on the owl; Melville on the hawk; Yeats on wild swans; Virgil on the harpies; Thomas Hardy on the darkling thrush; and Wallace Stevens on thirteen ways of looking at a blackbird.   Friendship Poems by FRIENDSHIP POEMS edited by Peter Washington A celebration of friendship in all its aspects--from the delight of making a new friend to the serene joys of longtime devotion. Poems about best friends, false friends, dear friends, lost friends, even animal friends. These poems have been selected from the work of great poets in all times and places, including Emily Dickinson, W.H. Auden, Henry Thoreau, Shakespeare, Sappho, Robert Frost, Rudyard Kipling, Walt Whitman, and many others.   For more on these and other titles in Everyman’s Library Pocket Poet Series visit Pocket Poets
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com  

Friday Reads: Haiku

In a world swirling with words… the haiku offers refreshment: three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables which capture the essence of a moment in time. Haiku is an ancient Japanese form mastered by Basho and Issa, brought to the West in the 20th century and celebrated by imagist poets such as HD and Ezra Pound. National Poetry Month seems a fine time to showcase some of our best Haiku collections. Reading some of these might even inspire a haiku or two in you.

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  Love Haiku by LOVE HAIKU: JAPANESE POEMS OF YEARNING, PASSION, AND REMEMBRANCE edited and translated by Patricia Donegan, Yoshie Ishibashi Haiku is celebrated as a concise form of poetry able to convey a singular moment with great clarity. While haiku most often depicts the natural world, when focused on the elements of love and sensuality, haiku can be a powerful vehicle for evoking the universal experience of love. In this elegant anthology, love is explored through beautiful images that evoke a range of feelings--from the longing of a lover to the passion of a romantic relationship. Written by contemporary Japanese poets as well as by haiku masters such as Basho, Buson, and Issa, these poems share not only the haiku poets' vision for love, but their vision of the poignant moments that express it.   The Pocket HaikuTHE POCKET HAIKU edited by Sam Hamill In this quintessential collection of haiku, translator Sam Hamill has compiled the best from the tradition, spanning the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, with particular focus on the three great masters: Basho, Buson, and Issa. Based on images from nature, the poems address the themes of joy, temporality, beauty, wonder, loneliness, and loss.   Moon Woke Me Up Nine Times by Matsuo BashoMOON WOKE ME UP NINE TIMES SELECTED HAIKU OF BASHO by Matsuo Basho, translated by David Young Basho, the famously bohemian traveler through seventeenth-century Japan, is a poet attuned to the natural world as well as humble human doings; "Piles of quilts/ snow on distant mountains/ I watch both," he writes. David Young, acclaimed translator and Knopf poet, writes in his introduction to this selection, "This poet's consciousness affiliates itself with crickets, islands, monkeys, snowfalls, moonscapes, flowers, trees, and ceremonies...Waking and sleeping, alone and in company, he moves through the world, delighting in its details." Young's translations are bright, alert, musically perfect, and rich in tenderness toward their maker.   The Art of Haiku by Stephen AddissTHE ART OF HAIKU: ITS HISTORY THROUGH POEMS AND PAINTINGS by Japanese Masters by Stephen Addiss In the past hundred years, haiku has gone far beyond its Japanese origins to become a worldwide phenomenon—with the classic poetic form growing and evolving as it has adapted to the needs of the whole range of languages and cultures that have embraced it. Here one of the leading haiku scholars of the West takes us on a tour of haiku poetry’s evolution, providing along the way a wealth of examples of the poetry and the art inspired by it.   Morning Haiku by Sonia SanchezMORNING HAIKU by Sonia Sanchez From a leading writer of the Black Arts Movement, poems of commemoration and loss for readers of all ages. This is a collection of haiku that celebrates the gifts of life and mourns the deaths of revered African American figures in the worlds of music, literature, art, and activism.     A White Tea Bowl by Mitsu SuzukiA WHITE TEA BOWL: 100 HAIKU FROM 100 YEARS OF LIFE by Mitsu Suzuki, Kazuaki Tanahashi, Kate McCandless Mitsu Suzuki is the widow of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, the Zen monk who founded the San Francisco Zen Center and helped popularize Zen Buddhism in the United States. A White Tea Bowl is a selection of her poems, written after her return to Japan in 1993. These 100 haiku were chosen by editor Kazuaki Tanahashi and translated by Zen teacher Kate McCandless to celebrate Mitsu's 100th birthday on April 27, 2014.   Haiku by HAIKU edited Peter Washington (Everyman’s Library edition) The pioneering translator R. H. Blyth believed that the spirit of haiku is present in all great poetry; inspired by him, the editor of this volume has included lines from such poets as Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Thoreau, and Hopkins, presented here in haiku form. Following them are haiku and haiku-influenced poems of the twentieth century–from Ezra Pound’s “In a Station of the Metro” to William Carlos Williams’s “Prelude to Winter,” and from the irreverence of Jack Kerouac to the lyricism of Langston Hughes. The result is a collection as compact, dynamic, and scintillating as the form itself.   Book of Haikus by Jack KerouacBOOK OF HAIKUS by Jack Kerouac, edited by Regina Weinreich Highlighting a lesser-known aspect of one of America's most influential authors, this collection displays Jack Kerouac's interest in and mastery of haiku. In this collection, Kerouac scholar Regina Weinreich supplements an incomplete draft of a haiku manuscript found in Kerouac's archives with a generous selection of Kerouac's other haiku, from both published and unpublished sources. With more than 500 poems, this is a must-have volume for Kerouac enthusiasts everywhere.   On Love and Barley by Matsuo BashoON LOVE AND BARLEY: HAIKU OF BASHO by Matsuo Basho, Lucien Stryk Basho, one of the greatest of Japanese poets and the master of haiku, was also a Buddhist monk and a life-long traveler. His poems combine 'karumi', or lightness of touch, with the Zen ideal of oneness with creation. Each poem evokes the natural world - the cherry blossom, the leaping frog, the summer moon or the winter snow - suggesting the smallness of human life in comparison to the vastness and drama of nature. Basho himself enjoyed solitude and a life free from possessions, and his haiku are the work of an observant eye and a meditative mind, uncluttered by materialism and alive to the beauty of the world around him.   FOR YOUNGER READERS   Haiku Baby by Betsy E. SnyderHAIKU BABY by Betsy E. Snyder Betsy Snyder’s beloved tabbed board book celebrates the seasons in haiku! in tickly-toe grass a buttercup offers up yellow nose kisses The simple delights in baby’s natural world—a bird, a fish, a leaf, a snowflake, a raindrop—are celebrated in the traditional Japanese poetic form, the haiku. In just 17 syllables, a moment, a season, the elements are joyfully captured. Betsy Snyder’s peaceful little board book has tabs to encourage little hands to turn the pages and adorable artwork to delight everyone!   I Haiku You by Betsy E. SnyderI HAIKU YOU by Betsy E. Snyder This gift-worthy little picture book of haiku by award-winner Betsy Snyder is something adults will love as much as they'll enjoy sharing it with the youngest listeners.     For more on these and related titles visit the edelweiss collection Haiku
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There's a Book for That: Psychology's Top 12

Have you read 12 RULES FOR LIFE? It’s the bestseller from Canadian Psychology Professor Jordan Peterson, a widely cited scholar of personality. The New York Times’ David Brooks calls Dr. Peterson “the most influential public intellectual in the Western world right now.” The popularity of his book reveals once again the appeal of thinkers who make sense out of the uncertainties of the human condition, i.e. offer antidotes. Those of us in publishing know also the power of finite numbers, so we’ll take the number and run. Here are Penguin Random House’s current top 12 psychology titles. Recurrent themes of community, surviving trauma, solitude, brain science and their applications for professional and personal success are meant to assist you on your journey:

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  12 Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson12 RULES FOR LIFE: AN ANTIDOTE TO CHAOS by Jordan B. Peterson What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us, among other things, why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers. (Available as an audiobook on May 8th).   Enlightenment Now by Steven PinkerENLIGHTENMENT NOW: THE CASE FOR REASON, SCIENCE, HUMANISM, AND PROGRESS by Steven Pinker “My new favorite book of all time.”—Bill Gates If you think the world is coming to an end, think again: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science.   When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. PinkWHEN: THE SCIENTIFIC SECRETS OF PERFECT TIMING by Daniel H. Pink Our lives are a never-ending stream of “when” decisions: when to start a business, schedule a class, get serious about a person. Yet we make those decisions based on intuition and guesswork. Timing, it’s often assumed, is an art. In When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Pink shows that timing is really a science. Drawing on a rich trove of research from psychology, biology, and economics, Pink reveals how best to live, work, and succeed.   Braving the Wilderness by Brené BrownBRAVING THE WILDERNESS: THE QUEST FOR TRUE BELONGING AND THE COURAGE TO STAND ALONE by Brené Brown A timely and important book that challenges everything we think we know about cultivating true belonging in our communities, organizations and culture. Brown argues that what we’re experiencing today is a spiritual crisis of disconnection, and introduces four practices of true belonging that challenge everything we believe about ourselves and each other. Brown writes, “The wilderness is an untamed, unpredictable place of solitude and searching. It is a place as dangerous as it is breathtaking, a place as sought after as it is feared. But it turns out to be the place of true belonging, and it’s the bravest and most sacred place you will ever stand.”   Leaders Eat Last by Simon SinekLEADERS EAT LAST: WHY SOME TEAMS PULL TOGETHER AND OTHERS DON'T by Simon Sinek Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work, feels trusted and valued during the day, then returns home feeling fulfilled. This is not a crazy, idealized notion. Today, in many successful organizations, great leaders create environments in which people naturally work together to do remarkable things. The best ones foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a “Circle of Safety” that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside. Sinek illustrates his ideas with fascinating true stories that range from the military to big business, from government to investment banking.   The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk, M.D.THE BODY KEEPS THE SCORE: BRAIN, MIND, AND BODY IN THE HEALING OF TRAUMA by Bessel van der Kolk, M.D. One of the world’s leading experts on traumatic stress explains how trauma affects people, its underlying neurobiology, and the many new treatments that are making it possible for sufferers to move beyond trauma in order to reclaim their lives.   The Power of Habit by Charles DuhiggTHE POWER OF HABIT: WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO IN LIFE AND BUSINESS by Charles Duhigg The break-out New York Times bestseller The Power of Habit shows us that by understanding the three-step “loop” all habits form in our brains—cue, routine, reward—we can change our behavior and take control over our lives.   Quiet by Susan CainQUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN'T STOP TALKING by Susan Cain The book that started the Quiet revolution In Quiet, Susan Cain argues that we dramatically undervalue introverts and shows how much we lose in doing so. After all, it is to introverts—Rosa Parks, Chopin, Dr. Seuss, Steve Wozniak—that we owe many of the great contributions to society. She charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal throughout the twentieth century and explores how deeply it has come to permeate our culture. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.   The Whole-Brain Child by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne BrysonTHE WHOLE-BRAIN CHILD: 12 REVOLUTIONARY STRATEGIES TO NURTURE YOUR CHILD'S DEVELOPING MIND by Daniel J. Siegel, Tina Payne Bryson In this pioneering, practical book, Daniel J. Siegel, neuropsychiatrist and author of the bestselling Mindsight, and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson offer a revolutionary approach to child rearing with twelve key strategies that foster healthy brain development, leading to calmer, happier children. The authors explain—and make accessible—the new science of how a child’s brain is wired and how it matures. Complete with age-appropriate strategies for dealing with day-to-day struggles and illustrations that will help you explain these concepts to your child, The Whole-Brain Child shows you how to cultivate healthy emotional and intellectual development so that your children can lead balanced, meaningful, and connected lives.   Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher, William L. Ury and Bruce PattonGETTING TO YES: NEGOTIATING AGREEMENT WITHOUT GIVING IN by Roger Fisher, William L. Ury, Bruce Patton Getting to Yes has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.   Mindset by Carol S. DweckMINDSET: THE NEW PSYCHOLOGY OF SUCCESS by Carol S. Dweck After decades of research, world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., discovered a simple but groundbreaking idea: the power of mindset. In this brilliant book, she shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities. People with a fixed mindset—those who believe that abilities are fixed—are less likely to flourish than those with a growth mindset—those who believe that abilities can be developed. Mindset reveals how great parents, teachers, managers, and athletes can put this idea to use to foster outstanding accomplishment.   Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. FranklMAN'S SEARCH FOR MEANING by Viktor E. Frankl, Foreword by Harold S. Kushner Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.     For more on these titles visit Top 12 Psychology Titles
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com                  

Friday Reads: Eudora Welty

“People are mostly layers of violence and tenderness wrapped like bulbs, and it is difficult to say what makes them onions or hyacinths.” ― Eudora Welty

 

 

For this week’s Friday Reads we are casting our gaze on Pulitzer-prize winning Southern writer Eudora Welty who was born this day, April 13th, 1901 and passed away in 2001. Welty was an American short story writer and novelist who wrote about the American South and has inspired many writers. Her novel THE OPTIMIST’S DAUGHTER won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973. She was the first living author to have her works published by the Library of America. Welty’s house in Jackson, Mississippi has been designated as a National Historic Landmark and is open to the public as a house museum.

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The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora WeltyTHE OPTIMIST'S DAUGHTER by Eudora Welty This Pulitzer Prize–winning novel tells the story of Laurel McKelva Hand, a young woman who has left the South and returns, years later, to New Orleans, where her father is dying. After his death, she and her silly young stepmother go back still farther, to the small Mississippi town where she grew up. Along in the old house, Laurel finally comes to an understanding of the past, herself, and her parents.   On Writing by Eudora WeltyON WRITING by Eudora Welty Eudora Welty was one of the twentieth century’s greatest literary figures. For as long as students have been studying her fiction as literature, writers have been looking to her to answer the profound questions of what makes a story good, a novel successful, a writer an artist. On Writing presents the answers in seven concise chapters discussing the subjects most important to the narrative craft, and which every fiction writer should know, such as place, voice, memory, and language. But even more important is what Welty calls “the mystery” of fiction writing—how the writer assembles language and ideas to create a work of art.   LOSING BATTLES by Eudora WeltyLOSING BATTLES by Eudora Welty Three generations of Granny Vaughn's descendants gather at her Mississippi home to celebrate her 90th birthday. Possessed of the true storyteller's gift, the members of this clan cannot resist the temptation to swap tales.     The Eye of the Story by Eudora WeltyTHE EYE OF THE STORY: SELECTED ESSAYS AND REVIEWS by Eudora Welty Much like her highly acclaimed One Writer's Beginnings, The Eye of the Story offers Eudora Welty's invaluable meditations on the art of writing. In addition to seven essays on craft, this collection brings together her penetrating and instructive commentaries on a wide variety of individual writers, including Jane Austen, E. M. Forster, Willa Cather, Anton Chekhov, William Faulkner, and Virginia Woolf.   Eudora Welty: Complete Novels (LOA #101) by Eudora WeltyEUDORA WELTY: COMPLETE NOVELS (Library of America) by Eudora Welty, edited by Richard Ford and Michael Kreyling Includes: The Robber Bridegroom / Delta Wedding / The Ponder Heart / Losing Battles / The Optimist's Daughter One of the most influential writers of the twentieth century, Eudora Welty’s novels and stories blend the storytelling tradition of the South with a modernist sensibility attuned to the mysteries and ambiguities of experience. In this Library of America volume and its companion, Welty explores the complex abundance of southern, and particularly Southern women’s, lives with an artistry that Salman Rushdie has called “impossible to overpraise.” In a career spanning five decades, she chronicled her own Mississippi with a depth and intensity matched only by William Faulkner.   Eudora Welty: Stories, Essays, & Memoirs (LOA #102) by Eudora WeltyEUDORA WELTY: STORIES, ESSAYS, & MEMOIRS (Library of America) by Eudora Welty; edited by Richard Ford and Michael Kreyling Stories, Essays and Memoir presents Welty’s collected short stories, an astonishing body of work that has made her one of the most respected writers of short fiction. Also included are two stories from the 1960s, notably “Where Is the Voice Coming From?”, based on the shooting of Medgar Evers.   Eudora Welty by Ann WaldronEUDORA WELTY: A WRITER'S LIFE by Ann Waldron Elegant and authoritative, this first biography to chart the life of a national treasure is a must-have for Welty fans and scholars everywhere. Eudora Welty is a beloved institution of Southern fiction and American literature, whose closely guarded privacy has prevented a full-scale study of her life and work--until now. A significant contribution to the world of letters, Ann Waldron's biography chronicles the history and achievements of one of our greatest living authors, from a Mississippi childhood to the sale of her first short story, from her literary friendships with Katherine Anne Porter and Elizabeth Bowen to her rivalry with Carson McCullers.   Watch Penguin Random House author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie give the 2017 Eudora Welty/Pen-Faulkner Lecture here   For more on featured Eudora Welty titles visit: Welty Friday Reads
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