Random House

Penguin Random House Publishes Three of Five Finalists for “The Tonight Show Summer Reads” – Vote for Your Favorite!

Kicking off what he called “the summer of reading,” Jimmy Fallon recently announced that he is launching The Tonight Show’s first-ever-book club. Dubbed the “The Tonight Show Summer Reads,” Jimmy picked five finalists and Penguin Random House publishes these three titles:

expand
THE IMMORTALISTS by Chloe Benjamin (Putnam) THE GOOD SON by You-Jeong Jeong (Penguin Books) PROVIDENCE by Caroline Kepnes (Lenny) Vote for your favorite book here by noon on Thursday, June 28. Then, tune into The Tonight Show on Friday night, June 29, when Jimmy Fallon will announce the official “Tonight Show Summer Read!” To share your enthusiasm on social media, follow Jimmy Fallon on Instagram and The Tonight Show on Facebook and interact using #TonightShowSummerReads #prhpartner. Watch Jimmy Fallon announce his book club: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRkZNEcLHuw

How One World’s Chris Jackson Discovered and Published Dr. Mona’s Story of Truth, Change and Hope

In WHAT THE EYES DON’T SEE: A Story of Crisis, Resistance and Hope in an American City (One World), Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha shares her powerful first-hand account of how an Iraqi-American pediatrician used science to prove Flint, Michigan kids were exposed to lead. In riveting detail, she takes readers into the heart of the crisis and how she successfully stood up against the government that accused her of spreading hysteria. But this book is not only about environmental injustice, it is a story of hope. It is about how each of us – no matter who we are, where we are, or how we ended up in this country – has the power to fix and change things.

expand
Here Chris Jackson, Vice President, Publisher, Editor in Chief, One World, reveals how he first came in contact with Dr. Mona, the process of working with her to develop her story and experiences into book form, and ultimately publishing WHAT THE EYES DON’T SEE: “I met Mona Hanna-Attisha at the Ridenhour Prize ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, back in 2016. I was there to present an award to one of my authors, Jill Leovy, author of GHETTOSIDE: A True Story of Murder in America; Dr. Mona was there to receive the Ridenhour Truthteller Prize for her work in Flint, Michigan, where she was a key whistleblower in that city’s devastating water crisis. Dr. Mona delivered a few remarks that day that moved me then and have stuck with me ever since. Mona spoke about whistleblowing being a 'choiceless choice' – that having seen what she saw, she had no choice but to risk her professional reputation and the wrath of her own state government to tell the truth she’d uncovered: that the state was poisoning its own children. She also generously dedicated most of her short talk to shining the spotlight on other heroes in Flint – activists, mothers, reporters, scientists – creating a portrait not of a singular, heroic savior, but of a community that came together to save itself. I approached her after her talk – wading through a crowd of other admirers – and asked her if she’d ever thought about writing a book. She took my card and six months later her proposal landed in my in-box. “Working with Dr. Mona has been its own process of discovery. At our first meeting back in Washington, all I knew about her was she was a pediatrician and a whistleblower. But in some ways, Dr. Mona had been preparing for her role in the crisis for her entire life. She was the child of Iraqi immigrants who came to this country fleeing a tyrannical dictator who poisoned his own people and by the time the crisis in Flint hit, she was an established pediatrician, researcher, and educator who had oriented her practice toward social justice. The book as we initially conceived it, wove these strands together – the immigrant story, the story of her incredible work before and after the crisis at the Hurley Pediatric Center, and, of course, the thrilling core narrative: the crisis and the bold detective work and outspoken advocacy that forced the whole country to pay attention. But the sum of the book had to be more than those three pieces. “A great book always needs to elevate its story with a theme that gives it deeper meaning – in other words, Dr. Mona and I had to figure out what the bigger story was that she was trying to tell. We didn’t just want a riveting, thrilling story of rule-breaking citizen activism; and we didn’t just want to provide much-needed information about lead and water. We realized that we wanted readers to be changed by the book – to see in the incredibly important story of Flint an even bigger story. Flint wasn’t just an anomalous event or even a tragedy. It was a deliberate government-abetted crime that reflected a twisted set of values. And we wanted the book to show how a different set of values–fighting for justice, respecting science, caring for the most vulnerable, especially children, and choosing truth over personal security or careerism—might point us toward a different way, with different outcomes. Dr. Mona and others have used the crisis as an opening for incredible, creative work in Flint, where they are building models for how communities can recover from histories of policy-driven violence and deprivation. We wanted the book to be a creative model in its way, too. “Our goal was to get all of this into the book and I think Mona succeeded. The book is a thriller about a crisis – ‘Grishamesque’ is how O Magazine described it—but more than that, it’s a book about the most urgent and timely challenges we’re facing right now as a society. It’s about how we must care for each other better. How we must tell the truth, even in the face of awful repercussions. And it’s about how we – as citizens – don’t have to wait for our politicians to get their acts together. We can fight for change where we stand, right now, because the stakes are too high to wait. “Dr. Mona will be appearing all over the media and traveling the country over the next weeks and months talking about her book and these deeper ideas. And just as Flint discovered in the water crisis, I think the country at large will find that our present crisis has met its ideal advocate: the daughter of immigrants, a driven scientist and caregiver, a passionate defender of children, and a powerful, fearless truthteller.” See and hear Dr. Mona talk about WHAT THE EYES DON’T SEE in conversation with Chelsea Clinton tonight at Barnes & Noble Union Square in NYC beginning at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Penguin Random House Author Philip Roth (1933 - 2018): Every Major Work In Print From Vintage

In mourning the loss of Philip Roth, who died Tuesday, May 22 in Manhattan, we take pride in the long, ongoing publishing history Penguin Random House imprints have with the career-spanning body of work he created. All of his more than 30 leading works are in print with us.

expand
Random House was the U.S. hardcover publisher of his first novel, LETTING GO (1962), and the astonishing PORTNOY’S COMPLAINT (1969). Bantam, long before its integration with Random House, reprinted those titles, as well as GOODBYE, COLUMBUS (1959), OUR GANG (1971) and THE GREAT AMERICAN NOVEL (1973), in widely read mass market paperback editions. Later, Vintage became the paperback publisher of every one of his major books, from GOODBYE, COLUMBUS to NEMESIS, his last: “A series of novels,” said The Guardian, “that shaped the course of American letters in the second half of the 20th century.” To view a complete list of his Vintage canon of titles, click here. It is our singular privilege to be the publisher of Philip Roth, and to continue to present multi-generations of his writings to U.S. readers.

Our 2018 James Beard Chef Award Winners: Gabrielle Hamilton Named Outstanding Chef and Abraham Conlon is Best Chef: Great Lakes

Champagne corks were popping in Chicago on Tuesday night at the 2018 James Beard Foundation Chef and Restaurant Awards ceremony when it was announced that the Outstanding Chef Award went to Gabrielle Hamilton, chef/owner of Prune restaurant in New York’s East Village and Random House author of the New York Times bestselling memoir, BLOOD, BONES & BUTTER: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef, and her cookbook, PRUNE. Random House will publish her new memoir, KIND REGARDS, next year.

expand
The bubbly flowed again when Fat Rice chef Abraham Conlon, co-author of THE ADVENTURES OF FAT RICE: Recipes from the Chicago Restaurant Inspired by Macau (Ten Speed Press), won the James Beard Award for Best Chef: Great Lakes. Congratulations to Ms. Hamilton and Mr. Conlon as well as their editors and publishers. View the complete list of 2018 James Beard Foundation Chef and Restaurant Awards winners here.

Our 5 L.A. Times Book Prize Winners

The 39th annual Los Angeles Times Book Prizes were announced at the L.A. Times Festival of Books this past weekend at the University of Southern California, and among the award winners for books published in 2017 were five titles from Penguin Random House imprints in the following categories:

expand
Fiction Mohsin Hamid, EXIT WEST (Riverhead Books) Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction Jenny Zhang, SOUR HEART (Lenny / Random House) The Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose Winner Benjamin Taylor, THE HUE AND CRY AT OUR HOUSE: A Year Remembered (Penguin Books) Current Interest Nancy MacLean, DEMOCRACY IN CHAINS: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America (Viking/Penguin) Science & Technology Robert M. Sapolsky, BEHAVE: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst (Penguin Press) Congratulations to our award-winning authors, their editors and publishers. To view the complete list of this year’s L.A. Times Book Prize winners, click here. The Los Angeles Times Book Prizes were first awarded in 1980, with the idea of honoring literary excellence and celebrating the community of readers in Los Angeles. The inspiration of former L.A. Times book editor Art Seidenbaum, those first prizes included awards in four book categories – fiction, history, general nonfiction and poetry.
Load more

A Vet’s Tales of Caring for Our Beloved Pets – Plus a Furry Friends Photo Gallery

National Pet Day was April 11 and our new Igloo Book Buzz selection, Suzy Fincham-Gray’s MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALS: A Veterinarian’s Stories of Love, Loss and Hope, was published by Spiegel & Grau on April 10. Looking at her life spent in the company of animals, veterinarian Fincham-Gray invites readers into her personal world of loving, healing, and assisting with the loss of our beloved pets, while showing the many ways they change our lives. In her literary debut, she writes with the same tenderness she brings to her patients, whose needs she must meet with her mind, her hands, and her heart.

expand
[caption id="attachment_110808" align="alignright" width="183"] Suzy Fincham-Gray
© Robin Dayle[/caption] “When I first considered writing a book,” says Fincham-Gray, “I was determined not to write a memoir; however, as I explored the subjects that interested me, I returned again, and again, to the career I have pursued for almost thirty years. This journey has required that I take a deeper and clearer look at my role, as both a veterinarian and as a pet owner, and has helped me understand more about human-pet relationships. The stories in this book are the ones that demanded I write them, the cats and dogs who revealed, in a new way, what it means to care for the animals we love.” The book was acquired and edited by Spiegel & Grau Editor Annie Chagnot: “When I first read Suzy’s manuscript I was riveted by her ability to craft such suspenseful scenes (think Grey’s Anatomy but with animals) and I was surprised by how much the material moved me. There’s an intimacy and grace to her writing that makes it transcend the ‘pet lit’ category—which made sense when I learned that in addition to being a veterinarian, Suzy also has an MFA in creative writing, which makes her a rare breed! This is a book that any animal lover MUST read, but it’s also so universal in its theme of how we care for the ones we love, that I can’t imagine a reader who wouldn’t be moved by it.” In celebration of the release of MY PATIENTS AND OTHER ANIMALS and National Pet Day, this week several Random House and Spiegel & Grau colleagues’ cats and dogs posed for the camera.    

4 of Our Books Shortlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award

The 10 finalists for the 2018 International Dublin Literary Award have been announced, the shortlist including 4 authors and their books published in the U.S. by Penguin Random House imprints. Sponsored by the Dublin City Council and managed by Dublin City Libraries, the international competition receives its nominations from public libraries in cities around the world and recognizes both writers and translators.

expand
The Dublin Literary Award, now in its 23rd year, is one of the richest literary prizes in the world, worth €100,000 to the winner. If the book has been translated, the author receives €75,000 and the translator €25,000. A five-member international judging panel, chaired by Eugene R. Sullivan, will select one winner, which will be announced by Lord Mayor, Ardmhéara, Mícheál Mac Donncha, Patron of the Award, on June 13 in Dublin, Ireland. Our shortlisters: HUMAN ACTS by Han Kang; translated from Korean by Deborah Smith (Hogarth) THE LESSER BOHEMIANS by Eimear McBride (Hogarth) LADIVINE by Marie Ndiaye; translated from French by Jordan Stump (Alfred A. Knopf)   MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON by Elizabeth Strout (Random House) To view the complete list of 2018 International Dublin Literary Award finalists, click here. To read an Irish Times article by Hogarth author John Boyne about this year’s shortlist, click here.

Three Penguin Random House Titles are Finalists for “One Book, One New York”

The Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment this morning launched this year’s “One Book, One New York,” the exciting citywide initiative that brings book-loving New Yorkers together to read the same book at the same time.  Among the five finalists are three books published by Penguin Random House imprints: 

expand
IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK by James Baldwin (Vintage) WHITE TEARS by Hari Kunzru (Vintage) BEHOLD THE DREAMERS by Imbolo Mbue (Random House) Building on the enormous success of the program’s inaugural year in 2017, this year’s campaign, in partnership with New York Magazine and Vulture, New Yorkers get to vote for one of five books all through the month of April . We encourage all Penguin Random House colleagues to vote for their favorite title here. Media and Entertainment Commissioner Julie Menin said, “We are enormously excited to present the five books in contention for this year’s One Book, One New York program. These beautifully told tales reflect the rich variety of experiences and voices that make New York’s literary culture second to none. We hope once again that One Book, One New York will inspire great conversations, foster compassion in difficult times, support our vital publishing industry, and spur New Yorkers to rediscover their local libraries and neighborhood bookstores.” Hari Kunzru, author of WHITE TEARS, said, “In the last decade, I’ve made a life in New York. I got married in the courthouse downtown, my children were born here. To be part of One Book is extraordinary. It makes me feel welcomed. It makes me very proud.” “BEHOLD THE DREAMERS is, among many things, a love song to my adopted hometown of New York City, so it is a tremendous privilege for me, that it is being consider for One Book, One New York,” said author Imbolo Mbue. “From my earliest days as an undergraduate student, James Baldwin’s life and work have provided a guiding force that has given me the courage to pursue work that has meaning and social impact,” said Barry Jenkins, writer/director of the film adaption of If Beale Street Could Talk. “With If Beale Street Could Talk, my favorite author renders the city and neighborhood that raised him in unflinching detail and with endless empathy and grace.” On Thursday, April 19 at 7:00 p.m., the four living nominated authors as well as director Barry Jenkins (Moonlight), who is making a film of the late James Baldwin’s IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK, will join a panel discussion as part of the Pen America World Voices Festival. Held at The New School’s auditorium in the Alvin Johnson/J.M. Hall, the event is free and open to the public on a first come, first served basis. After the month-long voting period, the winning book will be announced in early May. Once the winning book is picked, New Yorkers can look for events at their local libraries and throughout the city that will keep the discussion going all summer long.  

John A. Farrell’s RICHARD NIXON Wins New-York Historical Society Book Prize

RICHARD NIXON: The Life  by John A. Farrell (Random House) has won the New-York Historical Society’s Barbara and David Zalaznick Book Prize, awarded annually to the best work in the field of American history or biography. 

expand
Named in honor of philanthropists Barbara and David Zalaznick, the prize includes an engraved medal patterned after a medal in the New-York Historical Society’s collection, a $50,000 cash award to the author and the title American Historian Laureate. This prize, created “to encourage the general public to read works on American history,” will be officially presented to Mr. Farrell on April 13 as part of the historical society’s annual “Weekend with History” event.          

Elizabeth Strout Wins The Story Prize for ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE

Elizabeth Strout has won The Story Prize for ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE (Random House), receiving a $20,000 award and an engraved silver bowl at the 14th annual Story Prize event, which took place on Wednesday, February 28, at The New School in Manhattan.  The Story Prize judges offered high praise for Strout and her latest collection of short stories: “The intelligent prose is seemingly humble but elegant in its subtlety and enchanting in its overall effect. The blade of her wit is so sharp, you barely feel it until after the slice. Strout is a specialist in the reticence of people, and her characters are compelling because of the complexity of their internal lives, and the clarity with which that complexity is depicted. It is a sublime pleasure to read her work.”  

expand
The Story Prize runners-up – Daniel Alarcón for THE KING IS ALWAYS ABOVE THE PEOPLE  (Riverhead Books) and Ottessa Moshfegh for HOMESICK FOR ANOTHER WORLD  (Penguin Press) – were also honored and each received $5,000. Three independent Story Prize judges – Knopf/Vintage author and poet Susan Minot, critic and author Walton Muyumba, and Library Journal Associate Editor Stephanie Sendaula – selected the three finalists from among 120 submissions representing 93 different publishers or imprints, and then determined the winner. Warm congratulations to Ms. Strout, her editor and publisher.