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Friday Reads: Haiku

In a world swirling with words… the haiku offers refreshment: three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables which capture the essence of a moment in time. Haiku is an ancient Japanese form mastered by Basho and Issa, brought to the West in the 20th century and celebrated by imagist poets such as HD and Ezra Pound. National Poetry Month seems a fine time to showcase some of our best Haiku collections. Reading some of these might even inspire a haiku or two in you.

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  Love Haiku by LOVE HAIKU: JAPANESE POEMS OF YEARNING, PASSION, AND REMEMBRANCE edited and translated by Patricia Donegan, Yoshie Ishibashi Haiku is celebrated as a concise form of poetry able to convey a singular moment with great clarity. While haiku most often depicts the natural world, when focused on the elements of love and sensuality, haiku can be a powerful vehicle for evoking the universal experience of love. In this elegant anthology, love is explored through beautiful images that evoke a range of feelings--from the longing of a lover to the passion of a romantic relationship. Written by contemporary Japanese poets as well as by haiku masters such as Basho, Buson, and Issa, these poems share not only the haiku poets' vision for love, but their vision of the poignant moments that express it.   The Pocket HaikuTHE POCKET HAIKU edited by Sam Hamill In this quintessential collection of haiku, translator Sam Hamill has compiled the best from the tradition, spanning the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, with particular focus on the three great masters: Basho, Buson, and Issa. Based on images from nature, the poems address the themes of joy, temporality, beauty, wonder, loneliness, and loss.   Moon Woke Me Up Nine Times by Matsuo BashoMOON WOKE ME UP NINE TIMES SELECTED HAIKU OF BASHO by Matsuo Basho, translated by David Young Basho, the famously bohemian traveler through seventeenth-century Japan, is a poet attuned to the natural world as well as humble human doings; "Piles of quilts/ snow on distant mountains/ I watch both," he writes. David Young, acclaimed translator and Knopf poet, writes in his introduction to this selection, "This poet's consciousness affiliates itself with crickets, islands, monkeys, snowfalls, moonscapes, flowers, trees, and ceremonies...Waking and sleeping, alone and in company, he moves through the world, delighting in its details." Young's translations are bright, alert, musically perfect, and rich in tenderness toward their maker.   The Art of Haiku by Stephen AddissTHE ART OF HAIKU: ITS HISTORY THROUGH POEMS AND PAINTINGS by Japanese Masters by Stephen Addiss In the past hundred years, haiku has gone far beyond its Japanese origins to become a worldwide phenomenon—with the classic poetic form growing and evolving as it has adapted to the needs of the whole range of languages and cultures that have embraced it. Here one of the leading haiku scholars of the West takes us on a tour of haiku poetry’s evolution, providing along the way a wealth of examples of the poetry and the art inspired by it.   Morning Haiku by Sonia SanchezMORNING HAIKU by Sonia Sanchez From a leading writer of the Black Arts Movement, poems of commemoration and loss for readers of all ages. This is a collection of haiku that celebrates the gifts of life and mourns the deaths of revered African American figures in the worlds of music, literature, art, and activism.     A White Tea Bowl by Mitsu SuzukiA WHITE TEA BOWL: 100 HAIKU FROM 100 YEARS OF LIFE by Mitsu Suzuki, Kazuaki Tanahashi, Kate McCandless Mitsu Suzuki is the widow of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, the Zen monk who founded the San Francisco Zen Center and helped popularize Zen Buddhism in the United States. A White Tea Bowl is a selection of her poems, written after her return to Japan in 1993. These 100 haiku were chosen by editor Kazuaki Tanahashi and translated by Zen teacher Kate McCandless to celebrate Mitsu's 100th birthday on April 27, 2014.   Haiku by HAIKU edited Peter Washington (Everyman’s Library edition) The pioneering translator R. H. Blyth believed that the spirit of haiku is present in all great poetry; inspired by him, the editor of this volume has included lines from such poets as Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Thoreau, and Hopkins, presented here in haiku form. Following them are haiku and haiku-influenced poems of the twentieth century–from Ezra Pound’s “In a Station of the Metro” to William Carlos Williams’s “Prelude to Winter,” and from the irreverence of Jack Kerouac to the lyricism of Langston Hughes. The result is a collection as compact, dynamic, and scintillating as the form itself.   Book of Haikus by Jack KerouacBOOK OF HAIKUS by Jack Kerouac, edited by Regina Weinreich Highlighting a lesser-known aspect of one of America's most influential authors, this collection displays Jack Kerouac's interest in and mastery of haiku. In this collection, Kerouac scholar Regina Weinreich supplements an incomplete draft of a haiku manuscript found in Kerouac's archives with a generous selection of Kerouac's other haiku, from both published and unpublished sources. With more than 500 poems, this is a must-have volume for Kerouac enthusiasts everywhere.   On Love and Barley by Matsuo BashoON LOVE AND BARLEY: HAIKU OF BASHO by Matsuo Basho, Lucien Stryk Basho, one of the greatest of Japanese poets and the master of haiku, was also a Buddhist monk and a life-long traveler. His poems combine 'karumi', or lightness of touch, with the Zen ideal of oneness with creation. Each poem evokes the natural world - the cherry blossom, the leaping frog, the summer moon or the winter snow - suggesting the smallness of human life in comparison to the vastness and drama of nature. Basho himself enjoyed solitude and a life free from possessions, and his haiku are the work of an observant eye and a meditative mind, uncluttered by materialism and alive to the beauty of the world around him.   FOR YOUNGER READERS   Haiku Baby by Betsy E. SnyderHAIKU BABY by Betsy E. Snyder Betsy Snyder’s beloved tabbed board book celebrates the seasons in haiku! in tickly-toe grass a buttercup offers up yellow nose kisses The simple delights in baby’s natural world—a bird, a fish, a leaf, a snowflake, a raindrop—are celebrated in the traditional Japanese poetic form, the haiku. In just 17 syllables, a moment, a season, the elements are joyfully captured. Betsy Snyder’s peaceful little board book has tabs to encourage little hands to turn the pages and adorable artwork to delight everyone!   I Haiku You by Betsy E. SnyderI HAIKU YOU by Betsy E. Snyder This gift-worthy little picture book of haiku by award-winner Betsy Snyder is something adults will love as much as they'll enjoy sharing it with the youngest listeners.     For more on these and related titles visit the edelweiss collection Haiku
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There's a Book for That: Psychology's Top 12

Have you read 12 RULES FOR LIFE? It’s the bestseller from Canadian Psychology Professor Jordan Peterson, a widely cited scholar of personality. The New York Times’ David Brooks calls Dr. Peterson “the most influential public intellectual in the Western world right now.” The popularity of his book reveals once again the appeal of thinkers who make sense out of the uncertainties of the human condition, i.e. offer antidotes. Those of us in publishing know also the power of finite numbers, so we’ll take the number and run. Here are Penguin Random House’s current top 12 psychology titles. Recurrent themes of community, surviving trauma, solitude, brain science and their applications for professional and personal success are meant to assist you on your journey:

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  12 Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson12 RULES FOR LIFE: AN ANTIDOTE TO CHAOS by Jordan B. Peterson What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us, among other things, why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers. (Available as an audiobook on May 8th).   Enlightenment Now by Steven PinkerENLIGHTENMENT NOW: THE CASE FOR REASON, SCIENCE, HUMANISM, AND PROGRESS by Steven Pinker “My new favorite book of all time.”—Bill Gates If you think the world is coming to an end, think again: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science.   When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. PinkWHEN: THE SCIENTIFIC SECRETS OF PERFECT TIMING by Daniel H. Pink Our lives are a never-ending stream of “when” decisions: when to start a business, schedule a class, get serious about a person. Yet we make those decisions based on intuition and guesswork. Timing, it’s often assumed, is an art. In When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Pink shows that timing is really a science. Drawing on a rich trove of research from psychology, biology, and economics, Pink reveals how best to live, work, and succeed.   Braving the Wilderness by Brené BrownBRAVING THE WILDERNESS: THE QUEST FOR TRUE BELONGING AND THE COURAGE TO STAND ALONE by Brené Brown A timely and important book that challenges everything we think we know about cultivating true belonging in our communities, organizations and culture. Brown argues that what we’re experiencing today is a spiritual crisis of disconnection, and introduces four practices of true belonging that challenge everything we believe about ourselves and each other. Brown writes, “The wilderness is an untamed, unpredictable place of solitude and searching. It is a place as dangerous as it is breathtaking, a place as sought after as it is feared. But it turns out to be the place of true belonging, and it’s the bravest and most sacred place you will ever stand.”   Leaders Eat Last by Simon SinekLEADERS EAT LAST: WHY SOME TEAMS PULL TOGETHER AND OTHERS DON'T by Simon Sinek Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work, feels trusted and valued during the day, then returns home feeling fulfilled. This is not a crazy, idealized notion. Today, in many successful organizations, great leaders create environments in which people naturally work together to do remarkable things. The best ones foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a “Circle of Safety” that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside. Sinek illustrates his ideas with fascinating true stories that range from the military to big business, from government to investment banking.   The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk, M.D.THE BODY KEEPS THE SCORE: BRAIN, MIND, AND BODY IN THE HEALING OF TRAUMA by Bessel van der Kolk, M.D. One of the world’s leading experts on traumatic stress explains how trauma affects people, its underlying neurobiology, and the many new treatments that are making it possible for sufferers to move beyond trauma in order to reclaim their lives.   The Power of Habit by Charles DuhiggTHE POWER OF HABIT: WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO IN LIFE AND BUSINESS by Charles Duhigg The break-out New York Times bestseller The Power of Habit shows us that by understanding the three-step “loop” all habits form in our brains—cue, routine, reward—we can change our behavior and take control over our lives.   Quiet by Susan CainQUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN'T STOP TALKING by Susan Cain The book that started the Quiet revolution In Quiet, Susan Cain argues that we dramatically undervalue introverts and shows how much we lose in doing so. After all, it is to introverts—Rosa Parks, Chopin, Dr. Seuss, Steve Wozniak—that we owe many of the great contributions to society. She charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal throughout the twentieth century and explores how deeply it has come to permeate our culture. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.   The Whole-Brain Child by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne BrysonTHE WHOLE-BRAIN CHILD: 12 REVOLUTIONARY STRATEGIES TO NURTURE YOUR CHILD'S DEVELOPING MIND by Daniel J. Siegel, Tina Payne Bryson In this pioneering, practical book, Daniel J. Siegel, neuropsychiatrist and author of the bestselling Mindsight, and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson offer a revolutionary approach to child rearing with twelve key strategies that foster healthy brain development, leading to calmer, happier children. The authors explain—and make accessible—the new science of how a child’s brain is wired and how it matures. Complete with age-appropriate strategies for dealing with day-to-day struggles and illustrations that will help you explain these concepts to your child, The Whole-Brain Child shows you how to cultivate healthy emotional and intellectual development so that your children can lead balanced, meaningful, and connected lives.   Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher, William L. Ury and Bruce PattonGETTING TO YES: NEGOTIATING AGREEMENT WITHOUT GIVING IN by Roger Fisher, William L. Ury, Bruce Patton Getting to Yes has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.   Mindset by Carol S. DweckMINDSET: THE NEW PSYCHOLOGY OF SUCCESS by Carol S. Dweck After decades of research, world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., discovered a simple but groundbreaking idea: the power of mindset. In this brilliant book, she shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities. People with a fixed mindset—those who believe that abilities are fixed—are less likely to flourish than those with a growth mindset—those who believe that abilities can be developed. Mindset reveals how great parents, teachers, managers, and athletes can put this idea to use to foster outstanding accomplishment.   Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. FranklMAN'S SEARCH FOR MEANING by Viktor E. Frankl, Foreword by Harold S. Kushner Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.     For more on these titles visit Top 12 Psychology Titles
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com                  

Friday Reads: Eudora Welty

“People are mostly layers of violence and tenderness wrapped like bulbs, and it is difficult to say what makes them onions or hyacinths.” ― Eudora Welty

 

 

For this week’s Friday Reads we are casting our gaze on Pulitzer-prize winning Southern writer Eudora Welty who was born this day, April 13th, 1901 and passed away in 2001. Welty was an American short story writer and novelist who wrote about the American South and has inspired many writers. Her novel THE OPTIMIST’S DAUGHTER won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973. She was the first living author to have her works published by the Library of America. Welty’s house in Jackson, Mississippi has been designated as a National Historic Landmark and is open to the public as a house museum.

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The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora WeltyTHE OPTIMIST'S DAUGHTER by Eudora Welty This Pulitzer Prize–winning novel tells the story of Laurel McKelva Hand, a young woman who has left the South and returns, years later, to New Orleans, where her father is dying. After his death, she and her silly young stepmother go back still farther, to the small Mississippi town where she grew up. Along in the old house, Laurel finally comes to an understanding of the past, herself, and her parents.   On Writing by Eudora WeltyON WRITING by Eudora Welty Eudora Welty was one of the twentieth century’s greatest literary figures. For as long as students have been studying her fiction as literature, writers have been looking to her to answer the profound questions of what makes a story good, a novel successful, a writer an artist. On Writing presents the answers in seven concise chapters discussing the subjects most important to the narrative craft, and which every fiction writer should know, such as place, voice, memory, and language. But even more important is what Welty calls “the mystery” of fiction writing—how the writer assembles language and ideas to create a work of art.   LOSING BATTLES by Eudora WeltyLOSING BATTLES by Eudora Welty Three generations of Granny Vaughn's descendants gather at her Mississippi home to celebrate her 90th birthday. Possessed of the true storyteller's gift, the members of this clan cannot resist the temptation to swap tales.     The Eye of the Story by Eudora WeltyTHE EYE OF THE STORY: SELECTED ESSAYS AND REVIEWS by Eudora Welty Much like her highly acclaimed One Writer's Beginnings, The Eye of the Story offers Eudora Welty's invaluable meditations on the art of writing. In addition to seven essays on craft, this collection brings together her penetrating and instructive commentaries on a wide variety of individual writers, including Jane Austen, E. M. Forster, Willa Cather, Anton Chekhov, William Faulkner, and Virginia Woolf.   Eudora Welty: Complete Novels (LOA #101) by Eudora WeltyEUDORA WELTY: COMPLETE NOVELS (Library of America) by Eudora Welty, edited by Richard Ford and Michael Kreyling Includes: The Robber Bridegroom / Delta Wedding / The Ponder Heart / Losing Battles / The Optimist's Daughter One of the most influential writers of the twentieth century, Eudora Welty’s novels and stories blend the storytelling tradition of the South with a modernist sensibility attuned to the mysteries and ambiguities of experience. In this Library of America volume and its companion, Welty explores the complex abundance of southern, and particularly Southern women’s, lives with an artistry that Salman Rushdie has called “impossible to overpraise.” In a career spanning five decades, she chronicled her own Mississippi with a depth and intensity matched only by William Faulkner.   Eudora Welty: Stories, Essays, & Memoirs (LOA #102) by Eudora WeltyEUDORA WELTY: STORIES, ESSAYS, & MEMOIRS (Library of America) by Eudora Welty; edited by Richard Ford and Michael Kreyling Stories, Essays and Memoir presents Welty’s collected short stories, an astonishing body of work that has made her one of the most respected writers of short fiction. Also included are two stories from the 1960s, notably “Where Is the Voice Coming From?”, based on the shooting of Medgar Evers.   Eudora Welty by Ann WaldronEUDORA WELTY: A WRITER'S LIFE by Ann Waldron Elegant and authoritative, this first biography to chart the life of a national treasure is a must-have for Welty fans and scholars everywhere. Eudora Welty is a beloved institution of Southern fiction and American literature, whose closely guarded privacy has prevented a full-scale study of her life and work--until now. A significant contribution to the world of letters, Ann Waldron's biography chronicles the history and achievements of one of our greatest living authors, from a Mississippi childhood to the sale of her first short story, from her literary friendships with Katherine Anne Porter and Elizabeth Bowen to her rivalry with Carson McCullers.   Watch Penguin Random House author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie give the 2017 Eudora Welty/Pen-Faulkner Lecture here   For more on featured Eudora Welty titles visit: Welty Friday Reads
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com

Penguin Random House Named Audiobook Publisher of the Year at LBF

Penguin Random House Audio is the inaugural winner of the Audiobook Publisher of the Year prize, which was presented at the 2018 London Book Fair International Excellence Awards the evening of April 10.

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Amanda D’Acierno, Executive Vice President & Publisher, Penguin Random House Audio Group, said, “We are absolutely thrilled to be the first publisher to receive this award, which is especially meaningful in a year in which the London Book Fair is bestowing deserved recognition on the fast-growing significance of and popularity internationally for audiobooks and audio publishing.” “Crucial to Penguin Random House Audio’s success is finding the right voices, making accurate recordings and memorable performances,” commented the judges, who also noted the winner’s “professionalism, sheer quality, and scale of their ambition” The International Excellence Awards celebrate outstanding publishing merit in seventeen categories, and are judged by experts in each sector. The other shortlisters for the audiobook publisher of the year award, which was open to publishers outside the UK, were Brazil’s UBook.com and Kaishu Story Media & Culture Co from China. To view the complete list of 2018 LBF International Excellence Awards winners, click here.

There's a Book for That: April is National Autism Awareness Month

Nearly a quarter of a century ago, the Autism Society declared April National Autism Awareness Month as an excellent opportunity to promote autism awareness, autism acceptance and to draw attention to the tens of thousands facing an autism diagnosis each year. Through our publishing, Penguin Random House is part of the effort to educate and broaden perspectives about Autism Spectrum Disorder. Below are nonfiction and fiction titles which expand our understanding:

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  The Ostrich and Other Lost Things by Beth HautalaTHE OSTRICH AND OTHER LOST THINGS by Beth Hautala In this beautifully written middle grade novel, the bonds and challenges of caring for a sibling with autism are bravely explored, along with the pain and power that comes from self-discovery.     Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 by Naoki HigashidaFALL DOWN 7 TIMES GET UP 8: A YOUNG MAN'S VOICE FROM THE SILENCE OF AUTISM by Naoki Higashida, KA Yoshida, David Mitchell An extraordinary self-portrait of life as a young adult with autism. Like its bestselling predecessor, The Reason I Jump, Fall Down 7 Times Get up 8 opens a rare window into the mind and world of an autistic, non-verbal person. In short, powerful chapters, the author explores education, identity, family, society and personal growth. Introduced by award-winning author David Mitchell (co-translator with his wife, KA Yoshida), this book is part memoir, part critique of a world that sees disabilities ahead of disabled people.   In a Different Key by John Donvan and Caren ZuckerIN A DIFFERENT KEY: THE STORY OF AUTISM by John Donvan, Caren Zucker In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism. By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.   NeuroTribes by Steve SilbermanNEUROTRIBES: THE LEGACY OF AUTISM AND THE FUTURE OF NEURODIVERSITY by Steve Silberman This New York Times-bestselling book upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently. Going back to the earliest days of autism research, Silberman offers a gripping narrative of Leo Kanner and Hans Asperger, the research pioneers who defined the scope of autism in profoundly different ways; he then goes on to explore the game-changing concept of neurodiversity. NeuroTribes considers the idea that neurological differences like autism, dyslexia, and ADHD are not errors of nature or products of the toxic modern world, but the result of natural variations in the human genome. This groundbreaking book will reshape our understanding of the history, meaning, function, and implications of neurodiversity in our world.   Disconnected Kids by Robert MelilloDISCONNECTED KIDS: THE GROUNDBREAKING BRAIN BALANCE PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM, ADHD, DYSLEXIA, AND OTHER NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS by Robert Melillo The proven, drug-free program to treat the cause-not just the symptoms-of autism spectrum disorders and related conditions.     Thinking in Pictures, Expanded Edition by Temple GrandinTHINKING IN PICTURES, EXPANDED EDITION: MY LIFE WITH AUTISM by Temple Grandin Temple Grandin, Ph.D., is a gifted animal scientist who has designed one-third of all the livestock-handling facilities in the United States. She also lectures widely on autism--because Temple Grandin is autistic, a woman who thinks, feels, and experiences the world in ways that are incomprehensible to the rest of us. In this unprecedented book, Grandin delivers a report from the country of autism. Written from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person, Thinking in Pictures is the document of an extraordinary human being, one who, in gracefully and lucidly bridging the gulf between her condition and our own, sheds light on the riddle of our common identity.   The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonTHE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME by Mark Haddon A national bestseller and basis for the theatrical sensation – The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is an instant classic—both poignant and funny—about an autistic boy who sets out to solve the murder of a neighbor’s dog and discovers unexpected truths about himself and the world. First time in paperback.   For even more on these and related titles: AUTISM MONTH
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com  
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Friday Reads: Virtual Reality

Steven Spielberg’s “Ready Player One” is a hit, pulling in $181 million worldwide in box office receipts during its inaugural weekend. The attention has reinvigorated the screen adaptation of Ernest Cline’s second novel, Armada. Thus, for this week’s Friday Reads installment we invite you to discover fantastic books with virtual reality themes, including nonfiction!

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  Ready Player One by Ernest ClineREADY PLAYER ONE (MOVIE TIE-IN): A NOVEL by Ernest Cline The bestselling cult classic—basis of the major motion picture directed by Steven Spielberg. In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines—puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them.   Armada by Ernest ClineARMADA by Ernest Cline A cinematic, inventive, heartwarming, and completely nerdtastic adventure from the bestselling author of Ready Player One It’s just another day of high school for Zack Lightman. He’s daydreaming through another boring math class, with just one more month to go until graduation and freedom—if he can make it that long without getting suspended again.Then he glances out his classroom window and spots the flying saucer…   Virtual Reality by Jack ChallonerVIRTUAL REALITY by Jack Challoner A children’s book that explores the realities of virtual reality, explaining what VR is and how it works, and even includes an app download for five exclusive VR experiences and a cardboard viewer with stickers to make it your own.   Otherworld by Jason Segel and Kirsten MillerOTHERWORLD by Jason Segel, Kirsten Miller New York Times bestselling authors Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller imagine a world in which you can leave your body behind and give into your greatest desires in the first book in a fast-paced trilogy perfect for fans of the hit HBO show Westworld and anyone interested in the terrifying possibilities of the future of technology.   Death by Video Game by Simon ParkinDEATH BY VIDEO GAME: DANGER, PLEASURE, AND OBSESSION ON THE VIRTUAL FRONTLINE by Simon Parkin “The finest book on video games yet. Simon Parkin thinks like a critic, conjures like a novelist, and writes like an artist at the height of his powers—which, in fact, he is.” —Tom Bissell, author of Extra Lives: Why Video Games Matter     Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Tom SweterlitschTOMORROW AND TOMORROW by Tom Sweterlitsch In this “wild mash-up of Raymond Chandler, Philip K. Dick, and William S. Burroughs”*, a man who uses virtual reality to escape the horror of his dystopian world becomes obsessed with a mystery that could drive him mad.     For even more on these and related titles visit the collection: Virtual Reality
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com  

There's a Book for That: National Poetry Month!

Now I think poetry will save nothing from oblivion, but I keep writing about the ordinary because for me it’s the home of the extraordinary, the only home.

– Philip Levine

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  April is the coolest month for poetry lovers because poets – those soothsayers of our age –  are recognized for their talent for “putting the best words in the best order.” Whether you believe, as William Carlos Williams wrote, that “men die miserably every day for lack of what is found there,” we know that people turn to poetry at times of heightened emotion – be it joy or sorrow. During National Poetry Month poets will be out and about in bookstores and libraries giving readings and championing their art. National Poetry Month was established in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets. April was chosen by teachers, booksellers, librarians, and poets as a time to embrace and celebrate poetry—and to encourage the reading of poetry throughout the year. It has become one of the highest profile annual literary celebrations in the world! Dip into the pond of these newly published poetry volumes - from masters and mavericks -  and feel the ripple effect of their beauty. You guessed it! Metaphors be with you…   Brown by Kevin YoungBROWN: POEMS by Kevin Young James Brown. John Brown’s raid. Brown v. the Topeka Board of Ed. The prize-winning author of Blue Laws meditates on all things “brown” in this powerful new collection. Divided into “Home Recordings” and “Field Recordings,” Brown speaks to the way personal experience is shaped by culture, while culture is forever affected by the personal, recalling a black Kansas boyhood to comment on our times.   Poems of Rome by POEMS OF ROME edited by Karl Kirchwey (Everyman's Library) A beautiful hardcover Pocket Poets anthology of poems inspired by the art and architecture of the Eternal City. Poems of Rome ranges across the centuries and contains the work of poets from many cultures and times, from ancient Rome to contemporary America. Designed to accompany readers visiting the city—whether in person or in imagination—the book is divided into sections by place. The poets range from Horace and Ovid to Pasolini and Pavese, and from Byron and Keats and Rilke to James Merrill, Adrienne Rich, Derek Walcott, and Jorie Graham.   The Last Shift by Philip LevineTHE LAST SHIFT: POEMS by Philip Levine Now in paperback—the final collection of new poems from one of our finest and most beloved poets. The poems in this wonderful collection touch all of the events and places that meant the most to Philip Levine. There are lyrical poems about his family and childhood, the magic of nighttime and the power of dreaming; tough poems about the heavy shift work at Detroit’s auto plants, the Nazis, and bosses of all kinds; telling poems about his heroes—jazz players, artists, and working people of every description, even children. There is a peace within that comes to full fruition in Levine’s moving goodbye to his home town in the collection’s final poem, “The Last Shift.”   Night School by Carl DennisNIGHT SCHOOL by Carl Dennis (Penguin Poets) A masterful new collection of poetry from the winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the Ruth Lilly Prize The poems in Carl Dennis’s thirteenth collection are informed by an engagement with a world not fully accessible to the light of day, a world that can only be known with help from the imagination, whether we focus on ourselves, on people close at hand, or on the larger society. To read these poems is to find ourselves invited into a dialogue between what is present and what is absent that proves surprising and enlarging.   Orphic Paris by Henri ColeORPHIC PARIS by Henri Cole Henri Cole’s Orphic Paris combines autobiography, diary, essay, and poetry with photographs to create a new form of elegiac memoir. With Paris as a backdrop, Cole, an award-winning American poet, explores with fresh and penetrating insight the nature of friendship and family, poetry and solitude, the self and freedom. Written under the tutelary spirit of Orpheus—mystic, oracular, entrancing—Orphic Paris is an intimate Paris journal and a literary commonplace book that is a touching, original, brilliant account of the city and of the artists, writers, and luminaries, including Cole himself, who have been moved by it to create.   Blue Rose by Carol Muske-DukesBLUE ROSE by Carol Muske-Dukes (Penguin Poets) Carol Muske-Dukes has won acclaim for poetry that marries sophisticated intelligence, emotional resonance, and lyrical intensity. The poems in her new collection, Blue Rose, navigate around the idea of the unattainable - the elusive nature of poetry, of knowledge, of the fact that we know so little of the lives of others, of the world in which we live. Many of the poems draw inspiration from the lives of women who persisted outside of convention, in poetry, art, science: the painter Paula Modersohn-Becker; the pioneering molecular biologist Rosalyn Franklin, best known for her role in the discovery of DNA; and the American poet and writer Ina Coolbrith, California’s first poet laureate.   Dreampad by Jeff LatosikDREAMPAD by Jeff Latosik A hopeful, timely new collection of poems that take up our ever-evolving relationship with technology. Starting from an urge to reconcile the human need for stability with what’s happening in a constantly fluid “now,” Dreampad, Trillium Book Award for Poetry winner poet Jeff Latosik’s startling new collection, ponders whether an ideal for living is viable when we’re not sure we can say yes or no to anything in a world that’s growing increasingly ephemeral and entangled with the virtual.   American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century by AMERICAN POETRY: THE NINETEENTH CENTURY (The Library of America Anthology) edited by John Hollander At last in a deluxe collector’s edition boxed set, the most complete and authoritative anthology of 19th century American poetry ever published. From the lyrics of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson to folk ballads and moving spirituals, one of our nation’s greatest cultural legacies is the distinctly American poetry that arose during the nineteenth century. Unprecedented in its comprehensive sweep and textual authority, and now presented for the first time in a deluxe two-volume boxed set, the Library of America’s acclaimed anthology American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century reveals for the first time the full beauty and diversity of that tradition.   Dothead by Amit MajmudarDOTHEAD: POEMS by Amit Majmudar A captivating, no-holds-barred collection of new poems from an acclaimed poet and novelist with a fierce and original voice. Dothead is an exploration of selfhood both intense and exhilarating. Within the first pages, Amit Majmudar asserts the claims of both the self and the other: the title poem shows us the place of an Indian American teenager in the bland surround of a mostly white peer group, partaking of imagery from the poet’s Hindu tradition; the very next poem is a fanciful autobiography, relying for its imagery on the religious tradition of Islam. From poems about the treatment at the airport of people who look like Majmudar (“my dark unshaven brothers / whose names overlap with the crazies and God fiends”) to a long, freewheeling abecedarian poem about Adam and Eve and the discovery of oral sex, Dothead is a profoundly satisfying cultural critique and a thrilling experiment in language. United across a wide range of tones and forms, the poems inhabit and explode multiple perspectives, finding beauty in every one.   For even more on these and other poetry volumes: Poetry 2018
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Friday Reads: Sugar

April is the cruellest month, breeding

Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing

Memory and desire, stirring

Dull roots with spring rain.

                                                     – T.S. Eliot

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  It’s not just to honor April’s National Poetry Month that we quote Eliot.  As we embark on a weekend of holidays, the start of Passover and Easter Sunday, it may seem cruel to focus on the problems with sugar as you are preparing your Seder desserts or Easter Baskets. Still, the science is sound that sugar is our diet’s worst foe. Yet the wisdom of “everything in moderation” still sticks, and our publishing reflects that. To accompany the research, we’ve selected books with delicious, low – or no - sugar recipes. Let the reading, mixing and stirring begin!   The Case Against Sugar by Gary TaubesTHE CASE AGAINST SUGAR by Gary Taubes With his signature command of both science and straight talk, Taubes delves into Americans’ history with sugar and explains what research has shown about our addiction to sweets. He clarifies the arguments against sugar, corrects misconceptions about the relationship between sugar and weight loss; and provides the perspective necessary to make informed decisions about sugar as individuals and as a society.   The Sweet Spot by Bill Yosses and Peter KaminskyTHE SWEET SPOT: DIALING BACK SUGAR AND AMPING UP FLAVOR by Bill Yosses, Peter Kaminsky The former White House pastry chef for Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama presents a healthy, delicious collection of dessert recipes including Kabocha Persimmon Pie, Matcha Green Tea Roll with Fresh Berries and Cream, Alfonso Mango Cake, Lemon Kaffir Semifreddo, and Coconut Chocolate Apricot Cookies. All are designed to bring diners to their bliss point more quickly, so they can have their cake…and eat it too. Complete with professional tips for ensuring that each confection is a treat for the eye as well, The Sweet Spot will have cooks thinking about dessert in a whole new way.   Zero Sugar Diet by David Zinczenko and Stephen PerrineZERO SUGAR DIET: THE 14-DAY PLAN TO FLATTEN YOUR BELLY, CRUSH CRAVINGS, AND HELP KEEP YOU LEAN FOR LIFE by David Zinczenko, Stephen Perrine By replacing empty calories with essential ones—swapping in whole foods and fiber and swapping out added sugars—you’ll conquer your cravings and prevent the blood sugar surge that leads to some of the worst health scourges in America today, including abdominal fat, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, liver disease, fatigue, and tooth decay.   INCREDIBLE SUGAR-FREE BAKES by Caroline Griffiths This is a sweet baking book with a difference—all of the recipes are free from harmful sugars. Not that you’d notice it, of course—the recipes are triple-tested and completely delicious!  Caroline Griffiths has added natural sweetness using whole fruits and vegetables and, sometimes, other non-fructose sweeteners, including rice malt syrup, dextrose, and stevia. All of the recipes in this book contain less sugar than their traditional equivalent (many are completely sugar free)—while half the recipes are also gluten-free. The seventy simple-to-create recipes in the book show the diversity of sweet baking—from classic cookies to incredible baked desserts and show-stopping celebration cakes.   I Quit Sugar by Sarah WilsonI QUIT SUGAR by Sarah Wilson A New York Times bestseller, I Quit Sugar is week-by-week guide to quitting sugar to lose weight; boost energy; and improve your mood, and overall health, with 108 sugar-free recipes.     For even more on the subject of sugar visit: SUGAR
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com

Friday Reads: Spring Reading

Current conditions to the contrary, Spring sprang this week! Or so our calendars tell us. We are readers, we are patient: It won’t be long before snow and rain yield to sun and blooms. To cultivate that feeling of renewal this weekend (one likely spent indoors), we invite you to enjoy the following books for children and adults, all under the auspices of “Spring”!

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  Spring Garden by TOMOKA SHIBASAKISPRING GARDEN by Tomoka Shibasaki, Polly Barton Winner of the Akutagawa Prize, part of our Japanese novella series, showcasing the best contemporary Japanese writing. Divorced and cut off from his family, Taro lives alone in one of the few occupied apartments in his block, a block that is to be torn down as soon as the remaining tenants leave. Since the death of his father, Taro keeps to himself, but is soon drawn into an unusual relationship with the woman upstairs, Nishi, as she passes on the strange tale of the sky-blue house next door.   The Great Spring by Natalie GoldbergTHE GREAT SPRING: WRITING, ZEN, AND THIS ZIGZAG LIFE by Natalie Goldberg From beloved writing teacher and author of the best-selling Writing Down the Bones: a treasury of personal stories reflecting a life filled with journeys—inner and outer—zigzagging around the world and home again.     Springing by Marie PonsotSPRINGING: NEW AND SELECTED POEMS by Marie Ponsot From the award-winning poet of The Bird Catcher, this life-spanning volume offers the delight of both discovery and re-discovery, as Ponsot tends the unruly garden of her mind with her customary care and passion. The book opens with a group of new poems, including “What Would You Like to Be When You Grow Up?”—a question that has kept Ponsot’s work vital for more than five decades.   The Language of Spring by THE LANGUAGE OF SPRING: POEMS FOR THE SEASON OF RENEWAL Selected by Robert Atwan; Introduction by Maxine Kumin The Language of Spring collects some thirty of the most evocative English-language poems on the experience of spring. The poems range from the traditional and formal (Gerard Manley Hopkins’s "Spring" and Edna St. Vincent Millay’s "English Sparrows") to the contemporary, experimental, and diverse (Henry Reed"s "Naming of Parts," Marie Ponsot"s "Mauve," and William Carlos Williams"s "The Widow"s Lament in Springtime"). Each poem beautifully illuminates another small spot of time in the enthralling season of renewal.   SPRING SNOW by Yukio MishimaSPRING SNOW: THE SEA OF FERTILITY, 1 by Yukio Mishima Yukio Mishima’s Spring Snow is the first novel in his masterful tetralogy, The Sea of Fertility. Here we meet Shigekuni Honda, who narrates this epic tale of what he believes are the successive reincarnations of his friend, Kiyoaki Matsugae.     The Fires of Spring by James A. MichenerTHE FIRES OF SPRING: A NOVEL by James A. Michener An intimate early novel from James A. Michener, now remembered as the beloved master of the historical epic, The Fires of Spring unfolds with the bittersweet drama of a boy’s perilous journey into manhood. Featuring autobiographical touches from Michener’s own life story, The Fires of Spring is more than a novel: It’s a rich slice of American life, brimming with wisdom, longing, and compassion.   COMING IN MAY! Spring by Karl Ove KnausgaardSPRING by Karl Ove Knausgaard Spring follows a father and his newborn daughter through one day in April, from sunrise to sunset. A day filled with everyday routine, the beginnings of life and its light, but also its deep struggles and its darkness. Third in Knausgaard’s seasonal quartet, Spring is a deeply moving novel about family, our everyday lives, our joys and our struggles, beautifully illustrated by Anna Bjerger.   FOR YOUNGER READERS   Waiting for Spring 1 by AnashinWAITING FOR SPRING 1 by Anashin Mizuki is a shy girl who’s about to enter high school, and vows to open herself up to new friendships. Of course, the four stars of the boys’ basketball team weren’t exactly the friends she had in mind! Yet, when they drop by the café where she works, the five quickly hit it off. Soon she’s been accidentally thrust into the spotlight, targeted by jealous girls. And will she expand her mission to include…love?   The Penderwicks in Spring by Jeanne BirdsallTHE PENDERWICKS IN SPRING by Jeanne Birdsall Springtime is finally arriving on Gardam Street, and there are surprises in store for each member of the family. Some surprises are just wonderful, like neighbor Nick Geiger coming home from war. And some are ridiculous, like Batty’s new dog-walking business. Batty is saving up her dog-walking money for an extra-special surprise for her family, which she plans to present on her upcoming birthday. But when some unwelcome surprises make themselves known, the best-laid plans fall apart.   Cherry Blossoms Say SpringCHERRY BLOSSOMS SAY SPRING by Jill Esbaum (National Geographic Kids) Cherry Blossoms Say Spring looks at the life cycle of a cherry tree, the history behind the gift of the Japanese cherry trees to our nation's capital, and the association of cherry trees and spring. Vibrant scenes from the Cherry Blossom Festival and the flood of visitors to the Tidal Basin are balanced with shots of the natural beauty of these trees.   Spring Blossoms by Carole GerberSPRING BLOSSOMS by Carole Gerber, illustrated by Leslie Evans During a stroll through the forest, two children come across the small and white flowers on a crab apple tree, the rich, red buds on a red maple, and many more. Along the way, readers learn that some trees have both male and female flowers—each with a distinctive appearance. Told in lyrical rhymes with beautiful linoleum-cut illustrations, Spring Blossoms offers a unique blend of science, poetry, and art studies.   For more on these and other titles of the season visit  SPRING READING
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com          

There’s a Book for That: Epistolary Novels

This week we are leaping on the news that the beloved novel, THE GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL SOCIETY, is being adapted for a major motion picture by Netflix. Shaffer and Barrow’s epistolary novel (a tale told through letters) reminds us of the particular power over readers epistolary novels have.  So we have selected some of the best  of them from our catalog. These contemporary and classic works move from the era of parchment to email, and may just inspire the letter-writer in you: 

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    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Annie Barrows and Mary Ann ShafferTHE GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL SOCIETY by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows Juliet begins a remarkable correspondence with the society’s members, learning about their island, their taste in books, and the impact the recent German occupation has had on their lives. Captivated by their stories, she sets sail for Guernsey, and what she finds will change her forever.   Folded Notes from High School by Matthew BorenFOLDED NOTES FROM HIGH SCHOOL by Matthew Boren A status-obsessed senior unexpectedly falls for a freshman because of his Danny Zuko audition in their high school’s production of Grease in this outrageously funny epistolary novel set in 1991. For young adults and up...     Dear Committee Members by Julie SchumacherDEAR COMMITTEE MEMBERS by Julie Schumacher Jason Fitger is a beleaguered professor of creative writing and literature at Payne University, a small and not very distinguished midwest liberal arts college. His department is facing draconian cuts and squalid quarters, while one floor above them the Economics Department is getting lavishly remodeled offices. His once-promising writing career is in the doldrums, as is his romantic life, in part as the result of his unwise use of his private affairs for his novels. His star (he thinks) student can’t catch a break with his brilliant (he thinks) work Accountant in a Bordello, based on Melville’s Bartleby. In short, his life is a tale of woe, and the vehicle this droll and inventive novel uses to tell that tale is a series of hilarious letters of recommendation that Fitger is endlessly called upon by his students and colleagues to produce, each one of which is a small masterpiece of high dudgeon, low spirits, and passive-aggressive strategies.   Letters from Skye by Jessica BrockmoleLETTERS FROM SKYE by Jessica Brockmole A sweeping story told in letters, spanning two continents and two world wars, Jessica Brockmole’s atmospheric debut novel captures the indelible ways that people fall in love, and celebrates the power of the written word to stir the heart.     The Antagonist by Lynn CoadyTHE ANTAGONIST by Lynn Coady A piercing epistolary novel, The Antagonist by Lynn Coady demonstrates all of the gifts that have made its author one of Canada’s most respected young writers. Here she gives us an astonishing story of sons and fathers and mothers, of the rewards and betrayals of male friendship, and a large-spirited, hilarious, and exhilarating portrait of a man tearing his life apart in order to put himself back together.   Attachments by Rainbow RowellATTACHMENTS: A NOVEL by Rainbow Rowell Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It's company policy.) But they can't quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives. And then… "Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you . . ." Also available in a Spanish edition.   Daddy-Long-Legs and Dear Enemy by Jean WebsterDADDY-LONG-LEGS AND DEAR ENEMY by Jean Webster One of the great novels of American girlhood, Jean Webster's Daddy-Long-Legs (1912) follows the adventures of an orphan named Judy Abbott, whose letters to her anonymous male benefactor trace her development as an independent thinker and writer. Its sequel, Dear Enemy (1915), follows the progress of Judy's former orphanage, now run by her friend Sallie McBride, who struggles to give her young charges hope and a new life. Also available as a young readers’ edition.   Ella Minnow Pea by Mark DunnELLA MINNOW PEA: A NOVEL IN LETTERS by Mark Dunn Ella Minnow Pea is a girl living happily on the fictional island of Nollop off the coast of South Carolina. Nollop was named after Nevin Nollop, author of the immortal phrase containing all the letters of the alphabet, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” Now Ella finds herself acting to save her friends, family, and fellow citizens from the encroaching totalitarianism of the island’s Council, which has banned the use of certain letters of the alphabet as they fall from a memorial statue of Nevin Nollop. As the letters progressively drop from the statue they also disappear from the novel. The result is both a hilarious and moving story of one girl’s fight for freedom of expression, as well as a linguistic tour de force sure to delight word lovers everywhere.   A Woman of Independent Means by Elizabeth Forsythe HaileyA WOMAN OF INDEPENDENT MEANS by Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey A bestselling sensation when it was first published by Viking in 1978, A Woman of Independent Means has delighted millions of readers and was the inspiration for the television miniseries starring Sally Field. From the early 1900s through the 1960s, we accompany Bess as she endures life's trials and triumphs with unfailing courage and indomitable spirit: the sacrifices love sometimes requires of the heart, the flaws and rewards of marriage, the often-tested bond between mother and child, and the will to defy a society that demands conformity.   84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff84, CHARING CROSS ROAD by Helene Hanff This charming classic love story, first published in 1970, brings together twenty years of correspondence between Helene Hanff, at the time, a freelance writer living in New York City, and a used-book dealer in London at 84, Charing Cross Road. Through the years, though never meeting and separated both geographically and culturally, they share a winsome, sentimental friendship based on their common love for books. Their relationship, captured so acutely in these letters, is one that has touched the hearts of thousands of readers around the world.   Pamela by Samuel RichardsonPAMELA OR, VIRTUE REWARDED by Samuel Richardson Fifteen-year-old Pamela Andrews, alone and unprotected, is relentlessly pursued by her dead mistress’ son. Although she is attracted to young Mr B., she holds out against his demands and threats of abduction and rape, determined to defend her virginity and abide by her own moral standards. Psychologically acute in its investigations of sex, freedom and power, Richardson’s first novel caused a sensation when it was first published, with its depiction of a servant heroine who dares to assert herself.     For more on these and other novels in letters visit: Epistolary Novels
There’s a Book for That! is brought to you by Penguin Random House’s Sales department. Please follow our Tumblr by clicking here—and share this link with your accounts: theresabookforthat.tumblr.com. Thank you! Did you see something on the news or read about something on your commute? Perhaps you noticed something trending on Twitter? Did you think: “There’s a book for that!”? Then please, send it our way at theresabookforthat@penguinrandomhouse.com