ten speed press

Vibrant Photographs of Michelle Obama by Amanda Lucidon in New Book Coming from TSP in October

Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, announced today that it will publish a new book by former White House photographer Amanda LucidonCHASING LIGHT: Michelle Obama Through the Lens of a White House Photographer is a striking and intimate collection of 150 color photographs—

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many never before seen—along with personal reflections and stories from Ms. Lucidon, the Official White House Photographer from 2013 to 2017, the only female photographer during her time in the Obama White House.  North American print and digital rights to CHASING LIGHT, scheduled to be published on October 17, 2017, were acquired by Ten Speed Press Editor Kaitlin Ketchum from Rachel Vogel at Waxman Leavell Literary Agency.     Michelle Obama is one of the most admired First Ladies in our country’s history, known for her grace, spirit, and beauty, as well as for the amazing work she did during her tenure to promote girls’ education, combat childhood obesity, and support military families. In CHASING LIGHT, Ms. Lucidon shares a rare insider’s perspective, from documenting life at the White House to covering domestic and overseas travel. [caption id="attachment_7102" align="alignright" width="278"] Cover image by Amanda Lucidon, Copyright © 2017[/caption] CHASING LIGHT is a candid celebration of Michelle Obama. As one of the White House photographers responsible for documenting the First Family, Amanda spent four years traveling to twenty countries. During this time, Mrs. Obama became a role model to Amanda, who has since been inspired to share her own life story when she speaks with students about the power of art, education, and mentorship. “Mrs. Obama is a source of light and inspiration in my life,” says Amanda. “She was a mentor to me and so many people around the world. The work she has done with young people, especially girls and underserved youth, has helped me realize that I want to spend my life helping others reach their fullest potential.”CHASING LIGHT is a candid celebration of Michelle Obama. As one of the White House photographers responsible for documenting the First Family, Amanda spent four years traveling to twenty countries. During this time, Mrs. Obama became a role model to Amanda, who has since been inspired to share her own life story when she speaks with students about the power of art, education, and mentorship. Amanda Lucidon is an award-winning documentarian, filmmaker, and former freelance New York Times photographer who served as one of the White House photographers responsible for photographing First Lady Michelle Obama from 2013 to 2017. She is one of only a few female White House photographers in history and was the only woman photographer during her time in the Obama White House. Amanda attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she studied communications media and journalism; she also studied photography at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. Amanda’s work has been honored by Pictures of the Year International, National Press Photographers Association Best of Photojournalism, and the White House News Photographers Association, among others. She is currently a photographer, filmmaker, and public speaker based in Washington, D.C.

TSP Creative Director Emma Campion on Collaborating with House Industries

Emma CampionThe newly unveiled Watson-Guptill colophon came to life because of a close collaboration between House Industries and a visionary team led Ten Speed Press Creative Director Emma Campion. Here Emma answers three questions about this very fruitful working partnership.

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How would you describe the inspiration behind the new Watson-Guptill colophon and the creative process involved, from development to final design? Collaborating with House industries on their new book, HOUSE INDUSTRIES: The Process Is the Inspiration, was a real catalyst for us to work on a new colophon, especially as this is the imprint’s 80th anniversary. To begin the creative process, Executive Editor Jenny Wapner and I shared visuals and brand identities that inspired emotion and spoke to the history of the Watson-Guptill imprint. We winnowed our ideas down and decided to keep a thread to the original logo through the continued use of a horse but in a more modern and graphic format. House ran with the direction, and after digging into the history of the logo, they evolved the look, coming back with a great colophon that has personality and simplicity. What have been the most compelling aspects of your creative work with House Industries and the books that you have worked on together – including the new one – as well as their other projects? House clearly have the highest design skills, but their deep appreciation for textural elements and interesting, layered printing processes really pushed our skill and knowledge of bookmaking. Who do you see as the primary readers and consumers who are most interested in House Industries books Watson-Guptill has published? I see consumers from all creative fields coming to these books, as House pulls on their passions outside of just design and typography; their followers are diverse, avid typographers, vintage cars fanatics, cyclists, interior designers, parents with a passion for thoughtfully designed toys, and more. Read this corresponding article: Watson-Guptill Unveils New Colophon Created by House Industries

Watson-Guptill Unveils New Colophon Created by House Industries

watson guptillThe Crown Publishing Group is pleased to announce a new colophon design for its Watson-Guptill imprint, which publishes instructional and influential illustrated art books for both amateur and professional artists around the world. The new logo, which will debut on books published this summer, is a reimagining of Watson-Guptill’s classic horse icon, and was created by the renowned font design studio House Industries.

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Founded in 1937, and part of Ten Speed Press since 2013, Watson-Guptill is celebrating its 80th anniversary in 2017. The imprint publishes respected experts who instruct and inspire artists in a wide range of traditional and fine arts, including drawing, painting, craft, and printmaking. The first books to feature the new Watson-Guptill logo are the elevated craft book, THE FINE ART OF PAPER FLOWERS by San Francisco-based artist Tiffanie Turner (August 22), and two new titles in the legendary “Draw 50” series, DRAW 50 OUTER SPACE and DRAW 50 SEA CREATURES (both July 25). When asked about the decision to work with House Industries on the new logo, Ten Speed’s Creative Director Emma Campion explained: “Our in-house team wanted to realign the visual branding of the imprint, and when we became publishing collaborators with House Industries for their new Collection book series with us, they spoke with such reverence for the heritage of Watson-Guptill that they were the obvious choice for the redesign. We asked them to create a logo that felt bold and modern, but that retained the integrity of the brand’s history. We want the mark to communicate that we can stand astride the two worlds of traditional and more cutting- edge art instruction and design.” Known throughout the world for its eclectic font collections and far-reaching creative exploits, House Industries has been a standard-bearer for American graphic design for twenty-five years. House has worked with a diverse list of collaborators, including Jimmy Kimmel, the New Yorker, and the Estate of Charles and Ray Eames. House’s work is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, and will be the subject of a major exhibition at The Henry Ford Museum this summer. 9780399578106Their new book, HOUSE INDUSTRIES: The Process Is the Inspiration, an illustrative and entertaining journey through the studio’s creative process, will be published by Watson-Guptill on May 30.  The book marks the launch of the House Industries Collection, a new collaboration with the Crown Publishing Group. House Industries is represented by Katherine Cowles of the Cowles Agency. When asked about the challenge of creating the design, Andy Cruz, who art-directed the project, and Ken Barber, who handled the design, illustration, and typography, said: “The biggest challenge in developing the new identity for Watson-Guptill was creating a mark that would stand as a convincing extension of the publisher’s legacy, while maintaining a decidedly modern feel. The original logo, drawn by Norman Kent, was based on a pencil drawing by the imprint’s co-founder, Ernest Watson. Considering the brand’s heritage, as well as the publishing house’s long-standing commitment to both tradition and innovation in art instruction, we want the mark to represent a sense of history, while speaking to Watson-Guptill’s future.” Read this corresponding article: TSP Creative Director Emma Campion on Collaborating with House Industries

Our 2017 James Beard Books and Media Award Winners

JamesBeardFoundationLogoTnailThe annual James Beard Foundation Books, Broadcast and Journalism Awards were held Tuesday night in New York City. Ten Speed Press and Clarkson Potter won a combined seven awards, including the James Beard Book of the Year, which went to Clarkson Potter’s VICTUALS by Ronni Lundy, from Senior Editor Francis Lam. Francis also went home with two journalism awards of his own.  

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Book of the Year VICTUALS by Ronni Lundy (Clarkson Potter) james beard booksAmerican Cooking VICTUALS by Ronni Lundy (Clarkson Potter) Beverage SMUGGLER’S COVE by Martin Cate with Rebecca Cate (Ten Speed Press) Photography TASTE & TECHNIQUE by Naomi Pomeroy, photography by Chris Court (Ten Speed Press) Columns Francis Lam, “Eat”; “A Haitian Grandmother’s Home-Cooked Porridge”; “Kimchi Fried Rice, Korean Comfort Food”; and “Casa Calamari,” The New York Times Magazine (Senior Editor, Clarkson Potter) Food and Culture Shane Mitchell, “A Last Dinner in the Jungle,” Roads & Kingdoms (Far Afield, Ten Speed Press) Humor Francis Lam, “Recipes with Roots: The True Meaning of Turkey,” Cooking Light (Senior Editor, Clarkson Potter) Congratulations to all of our award winners and the publishing teams at Clarkson Potter and Ten Speed Press. View the complete list of James Beard Foundation Media Award winners here. The Chef and Restaurants James Beard Foundation awards will be announced in Chicago on Monday, May 1.

In Memoriam: Richard Nelson Bolles

richard nelson bollesWe are deeply saddened by the news of the death of our beloved longtime author, Richard Nelson Bolles. His unending intellectual curiosity about the world around him–and the people in it–gave him the energy and drive to update his career classic, WHAT COLOR IS YOUR PARACHUTE?, every year for more than forty-five years. His guide, originally a self-

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published passion project created in 1970, grew into a worldwide phenomenon that helped build Ten Speed Press into the publisher it is today. As a number of us at Ten Speed can attest, so many people have come up to us over the years saying they never would have found their life’s work without his influence. What a truly incredible legacy. Dick, as he was affectionately known by his friends, always said “You were put here on Earth for a reason. You need to find it.” Together, we are honored to continue his legacy as WHAT COLOR IS YOUR PARACHUTE? helps new generations of readers find their passion and purpose in life. –Ten Speed Press, The Crown Publishing Group
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Our International Association of Culinary Professionals 2017 Award Winners

IACP-LogoOn Sunday evening, The International Association of Culinary Professionals announced the winners of its 2017 Awards at The Louisville Palace Theater in Louisville, KY.  The awards recognize the very best food writing of the year, from cookbooks to journalism to photography and digital media. Four Penguin Random House books and authors, and one editor took home awards.

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Here are our winners in the following categories: COOKBOOKS American New IACP AWARDS 2017VICTUALS: An Appalachian Journey, with Recipes by Ronni Lundy (Clarkson Potter), editor: Francis Lam International TASTING ROME: Fresh Flavors and Forgotten Recipes from an Ancient City by Katie Parla and Kristina Gill (Clarkson Potter), editor: Amanda Englander Food Photography & Styling TASTE & TECHNIQUE: Recipes to Elevate Your Home Cooking by Naomi Pomeroy; photographed by Chris Court; styled by Naomi Pomeroy and Ellen Laing (Ten Speed Press), editor: Julie Bennet Cookbook Design NANBAN: Japanese Soul Food by Tim Anderson (Clarkson Potter), editor: Ashley Meyer FOOD WRITING AWARDS Food-Focused Column Congratulations also to Clarkson Potter Editor-at-Large Francis Lam on his win for Food-Focused Column: “From Grandmother’s House to Hers; Shamelessly French; Korean Comfort Food; Casa Calamari,” in The New York Times Magazine and to his author Ronni Lundy, who in addition to her book win, was announced as an IACP Trailblazer Honoree, chosen for their passion and impact on the food community. Congratulations to all of our winners! To view the complete list of winners click here.

Three Questions for TASTE Editor in Chief Matt Rodbard

Taste 3 questionsTo herald the arrival of  TASTE (tastecooking.com), an online food magazine launched in partnership with the Crown Publishing Group, we posed three questions to Matt Rodbard, who will direct TASTE’s editorial vision, strategy, and content development.

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With your extensive background as an editor, writer and author in the food and cooking realm, what factors led to your decision to become TASTE’s Editor in Chief? Honestly, the first reason I came here is the books. Clarkson Potter and Ten Speed Press make the best food and food culture books in the business. Hands down. Over the years, I’ve gotten to know many Crown Publishing authors, and then eventually I became one myself, and I just have so much respect for the teams producing, marketing, and selling these things. The next factor was the opportunity (and support) to launch a truly unique online cooking and culture magazine. The Crown leadership saw a clear lane to success in a crowded race, and really have gone for it. I have no idea where that racing metaphor came from! But it’s the truth. In what ways will TASTE – as an online magazine and a brand – stand out in the marketplace and fully maximize the capabilities of your format, your global scope, and the breadth of your talented team of contributors? TASTEscreenshot2Standing out in a crowded field is important, no doubt. But what we’re trying to avoid are some of the cheap tricks sometimes used to do this on the Internet: click-bait headlines, circular food content jammed into the square news cycle, images of bacon and burgers ad nauseam. All that isn’t TASTE. What we can do is publish a weekly slate of stories that are unique and tackle an exciting, and sometimes surprising, range of topics. We recently sent a journalist to Denmark during the darkest days of winter to witness firsthand what it’s like to cook and live in the hygge way—a trend you may have read about in the Guardian or New York Times Styles section, but one that hasn’t been fully reported from the ground. We have stories about the art of Malaysian meat on a stick, and how the Instant Pot might be the world’s first viral kitchen appliance. Did you ever wonder how to cook with yuzu juice? We have that story coming. Why do you think there is such a universal fascination with cooking and the culinary arts in the world today, and how will TASTE engage most successfully with this ever-growing consumer base? Here’s a fact: You have to eat at least three times a day. And for many of us that’s a baseline! Food is universal; it’s the connective tissue that keeps us running as a society. So, unlike sports or film or marathon running, food is a requirement. It’s life. Our goal is to tell stories about food and cooking that takes this requirement and adds some color and detail. We seek to answer questions, but also to ask them. And we think there’s a growing swell of people who are thinking more and more about not just the best brick-oven pizza in their hometown (for the record, in NYC, it’s Motorino), but how to make traditional Neapolitan pies at home.